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#1 Jun 27 2010 at 3:25 PM Rating: Decent
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What can I do to reach the preformance standards of the benchmark? I put this up before and was told to upgrade my video card, but I would also like to know if I need to update my processor.

Also, any sites where I can learn how to maximize preformance(i hear overclocking often). Any help?

Processor: AMD Anthlon II x4 630, 2.80GHZ

Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9100
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#2 Jun 27 2010 at 5:11 PM Rating: Default
Meraris wrote:
What can I do to reach the preformance standards of the benchmark? I put this up before and was told to upgrade my video card, but I would also like to know if I need to update my processor.

Also, any sites where I can learn how to maximize preformance(i hear overclocking often). Any help?

Processor: AMD Anthlon II x4 630, 2.80GHZ

Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9100


Really not appropriate to start a new thread to ask a question you've already asked and already had answered. Google overclocking for your processor. It's different for every processor and motherboard. As much as I and others have tried to help steer people in the right direction, this isn't a tech forum. You have to take responsibility for your own shenanigans and learn on your own what your options are and what you need to do to reach the level of performance you're wanting to see.
#3 Jun 27 2010 at 5:13 PM Rating: Good
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Your processor should be fine at that clock speed. Grab an ATI 5750 or better and you should be fine.

Unfortunately I don't know much about overclocking. I'd also like a good dummy-proof guide because I'm not brave enough to **** around with it.
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Ok, now we're going to get slash fiction of Wint x Kachi somehere... rule 34 and all...

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#4 Jun 27 2010 at 6:36 PM Rating: Good
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Isn't this a laptop? It's unlikely you'll be able to upgrade the graphics card and you probably wont be able to do the processor either (though, I don't think you'd need to). It would also be very unwise to overclock the graphics card considering how hot laptops get even at stock clock.

Only thing to do is to buy a new computer or a PS3.

I also offer the advice that you shouldn't ever buy a gaming laptop unless you have a lot of money or simply are on the road too much to carry around a desktop. Gaming laptops really stop performing well after just a year or two considering their parts are built for size and heat management, not graphical power.

If you want to play games well don't shell out the 2k or more for a gaming laptop. Spend 300-600 on a netbook or cheap laptop for whatever reason you need the mobility for and use the rest to buy or build a good desktop.

Edited, Jun 27th 2010 6:37pm by Yogtheterrible
#5 Jun 27 2010 at 6:53 PM Rating: Good
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if you have not overclocked before... don't bother. Any minor performance you may gain from a, pardon my phrasing, uneducated overclock, will not be worth it.

With my rig it will run @ approx 15-20 FPS

Intel core 2 @ 2.13ghz
Geforce 9800GTX+
4gb ram

The limit of most if not all systems that run this game will be the video card. I ran the test at work with a crummy radeon and it's a faster system then at home and i think i got about 600 on the bench... probably about 5~ fps at best.


If you are that worried about money just don't bother with the PC, or wait until parts drop in price if you must stay on a PC.

Just my 2cents...
#6 Jun 27 2010 at 7:19 PM Rating: Decent
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The other thing to remember is that SE's devs have stated that a lot of the testers are suffering from bottle necking at their graphics card, and that the issue is being worked out during beta. I would not take the benchmark as gospel at this point.
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#7 Jun 27 2010 at 7:44 PM Rating: Decent
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if you have not overclocked before... don't bother. Any minor performance you may gain from a, pardon my phrasing, uneducated overclock, will not be worth it.


Is OCing really that complicated, or just risky? I have a few spare computers I can practice with, but everyone has to do something the first time before they can do it again.
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Hyrist wrote:
Ok, now we're going to get slash fiction of Wint x Kachi somehere... rule 34 and all...

Never confuse your inference as the listener for an implication of the speaker.

Good games are subjective like good food is subjective. You're not going to seriously tell me that there's not a psychological basis for why pizza is great and lutefisk is revolting. The thing about subjectivity is that, as subjects go, humans actually have a great deal in common.
#8 Jun 27 2010 at 7:49 PM Rating: Decent
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Over Clocking really isn't complicated at all, you can try an google your CPU/motherboard combo and go from there, you usually can get a idea from other people's setup's. everyone has to start somewheres. best place will probably be your motherboards manufactures forums.
#9 Jun 27 2010 at 8:29 PM Rating: Good
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Run AMD Overdrive. It's a free download. I'm not sure how accurate it is but I OC'd my 965 to 3.8 stable and it showed up when I ran cpu-z. Just be carefull and start small. I went to 4.0 and bluescreened after about 4 minutes with th OD benchmark. Backed it off a hair and it's been running great for roughly 14 hours now. My initial scores with the FF benchmark were 3900-ish with stock settings and a hair under 4400 with the slight OC. I don't think your GPU will cut it though. My 9500GT got me a score of 861 LOL. I bought a $150 5770 and the score jumped to 3900+.

Edit: My scores are based on low as my monitor has a native res of 1440 X 900 and does not support 1080.

Edited, Jun 27th 2010 10:31pm by jhariya
#10 Jun 27 2010 at 8:30 PM Rating: Good
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Yogtheterrible wrote:
I also offer the advice that you shouldn't ever buy a gaming laptop unless you have a lot of money or simply are on the road too much to carry around a desktop


This is me for sure. I wish I was at home enough to justify building me another desktop but unfortunately I am gone way too much for that to be a smart decision.

I do, however, expect to play the game with minimal problems when the game launches on my laptop.
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#11 Jun 27 2010 at 10:06 PM Rating: Decent
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There was a pretty good beginner's guide linked in one of the recent forums (can't find the page html off the top of my head) but typing your motherboard/CPU/graphics card into google should give you a starting point.

Whilst I don't hold myself out as an overclocking expert, from the recent reading up I've done on this topic, it broadly involves increasing the frequency (i.e. clock speeds) and/or multipliers used by a CPU/GPU/RAM in conjunction with varying the voltage used in powering those parts in your PC, to make said parts run faster than their default settings.

Effectively, the process involves playing around in your PC's bios settings (although some things can be overclocked using programs operated in Windows)until you achieve stability (i.e. your system doesn't crash within a specified time frame) and you don't destroy your hardware (i.e. burnt out hardware which may void warranty specifications). A lot of it is trial and error so be prepared for frustration (and blown up parts if you don't do it carefully).

If you are new to overclocking, I would probably suggest taking your PC to your local specialist PC store to ask them to give you a rundown on what can be achieved and how to go about it. Usually, it involves a lot of tweaking options, testing and additional cooling requirements and at some point it may not be worth overclocking (i.e. you should build a new system).
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#12 Jun 28 2010 at 2:12 AM Rating: Decent
If you guys are going to provide only general advice on overclocking, it's best to provide none at all. The risk of damage is too great.

Overclocking on its own is usually pretty safe. You still need to know your motherboard and know what options you have to reset your BIOS to default (factory) settings if you overdo it and wind up unable to boot. If your motherboard doesn't come with such options, it's best to just leave things stock and not worry about overclocking.

Overvolting is what fries components if done improperly. Too much voltage and things get wrecked. Even if you bump the voltage within safe levels (ie. the voltage itself doesn't directly damage your expensive bits and pieces), the additional heat generated can do all kinds of ugly things. Beyond a certain temperature, most newer motherboards and processors will throttle back to prevent damage but you still shorten the life of your components. That last thing anyone needs is a fried MOSFET.
#13 Jun 28 2010 at 2:53 AM Rating: Decent
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Meraris wrote:
What can I do to reach the preformance standards of the benchmark? I put this up before and was told to upgrade my video card, but I would also like to know if I need to update my processor.

Also, any sites where I can learn how to maximize preformance(i hear overclocking often). Any help?

Processor: AMD Anthlon II x4 630, 2.80GHZ

Card: NVIDIA GeForce 9100


Just my humble suggestion,
As computer is only 'as strong as its weakest link',
no matter how much you overclock the CPU, or anykind of upgrade to the CPU,
your 9100 WILL bottleneck everything since it is really not up to current gaming. (it is an on board!)

For your CPU alone it should be enough, my AMD Phenom x4 9750 (2.4Ghz) scored around 2700 on 720.
(but I am using GeForce GTS250 and 8GB DDR2 RAM)

Edited, Jun 28th 2010 2:05am by timmyofalex
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#14 Jun 28 2010 at 5:40 AM Rating: Good
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Kachi wrote:
Quote:
if you have not overclocked before... don't bother. Any minor performance you may gain from a, pardon my phrasing, uneducated overclock, will not be worth it.


Is OCing really that complicated, or just risky? I have a few spare computers I can practice with, but everyone has to do something the first time before they can do it again.


If you do your research ahead of time, OC is generally not risky or complicated, but you'll often want additional/custom cooling to be on the safe side. The important thing though is that you need to do a little bit of reading (google is your friend) to get an idea of what's possible and then you need to experiment a little bit to find out what's stable. The more you push any piece of hardware, generally the faster it will fail or the less stable it will be.

On a laptop, OC isn't generally a great idea. They tend to have very limited cooling options, and can't just swap out the MOBO or power supply if needed, the way you typically can with a desktop.

Edited, Jun 28th 2010 7:45am by KarlHungis
#15 Jun 28 2010 at 5:51 AM Rating: Decent
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Potentially stupid question, but does a few degrees difference on stock air make much difference? Basically, I'm wondering if the fact that I keep my home at 65F, 5 to 10 degrees cooler than most people, gives me any additional leeway with cooling problems. Or do components get so hot that a few degrees F amounts to nothing?
____________________________
Hyrist wrote:
Ok, now we're going to get slash fiction of Wint x Kachi somehere... rule 34 and all...

Never confuse your inference as the listener for an implication of the speaker.

Good games are subjective like good food is subjective. You're not going to seriously tell me that there's not a psychological basis for why pizza is great and lutefisk is revolting. The thing about subjectivity is that, as subjects go, humans actually have a great deal in common.
#16 Jun 28 2010 at 6:26 AM Rating: Good
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423 posts
Quote:
Potentially stupid question, but does a few degrees difference on stock air make much difference? Basically, I'm wondering if the fact that I keep my home at 65F, 5 to 10 degrees cooler than most people, gives me any additional leeway with cooling problems. Or do components get so hot that a few degrees F amounts to nothing?


If you have some heavy duty fans in your computer it could help. It could give you... a minor difference but i can't see it making much difference.

The whole problem with OC'ing anything major to the point where you see ANY gains in relation to gaming is just so not worth it for the majority of people. OC'ing is a niche area for people that just like to see the performance gain or those who do things like folding@home.

Oc'ing you have to remember some basic things.

Watch power consumption: It will go up and if you built your pc with minimal power in mind... watch out. Cheap power supplies fry due to the extra power needed and they tend to get hotter like everything else. They also don't usually keep steady power and can be issues for many OC's failing that a majority of the people that never OC before will never notice. Remember that this will always be the base for any system when you OC and Cheap supplies wreck parts when they go too.

Heat/Noise: Your pc will get hot, if you're in a computer room upstairs during the summer it will be unbearable for you and your computer, think it's hot when it's not OC'ed, magnify that. It will also get much more noisy. Unless you add a lot more slower moving fans the fans you do have will be moving faster and fans get significantly noisier the faster they get. note that heat ruins parts too, get too hot on your video card it locks up your os and fails, get too hot and it can cause damage, same goes for CPU except that usually is a little more obvious by turning your pc off.

Testing: Remember that your have to "prime" your computer, which means running it at 100% usuage for a certain amount of time to attain whether the OC itself is stable. It's no easy task when your computer may fail on one task you tested for but not another...

In the end, once you learn all this kind of stuff to look out for, how to OC and find out what parts work well and what do not, OC'ing is a breeze. But is it worth all this effort? Majority of people should say no because the time and effort it will take to squeeze out that 5FPS for gaming... you could have purchased multiple new computers/video cards for all the time you spent. In the end it's up to you, i just personally say anyone doing this strictly to get better response in gaming shouldn't bother. I am not trying to discourage you too, just trying to show you what an incredible waste of time it can be if you do it for the wrong reasons.

PS... before i forget, most people that OC, custom build their computer before hand with the right parts to do it properly. They have the right coolers, supplies, motherboards etc. A lot of these people do aftermarket cooling, whether that be high end air, liquid or phase(think of it like a fridge but only on a 1"x1" square). IF you plan on doing anything extensive it will require some modification unless you custom built your pc for this exact thing in mind... however you wouldn't be on zam asking... lol.

Edited, Jun 28th 2010 6:39am by boriss
#17 Jun 28 2010 at 2:00 PM Rating: Good
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Really not appropriate to start a new thread to ask a question you've already asked and already had answered.


Asking again as I cant find the old topic.


Thanks for the suggestions, just buying a PS3. Ill wait on the graphics card for a bit.


Also its a desktop, a relativly cheap one, but meh, its whats in my budget.
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