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No Excuses NOT To Build Your Own RigFollow

#1 Jul 14 2010 at 1:05 PM Rating: Decent
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Building a computer is really simple. I mean... a ten year old could do this. Anyways I found a set of videos on Youtube that pretty much tells you everything you need to know. Stop wasting money on proprietary desktops from big name companies. They lock their BIOS down, use their own parts that are not universal and some systems can't even be fully upgraded. So follow these videos and you will be a computer building master! Thanks goes to PCWizkid @ Youtube.

Also a lot of people think computer parts will break at like the slightest bend or touch, this is not true. There's a lot of flexibility, and in the TigerDirect video he builds the computer with the motherboard laying right on a table. It's like legos really. It's all self explanatory.

I will admit it's a bit frustrating figuring things out from instructions but for the most part everything is labeled, self-explanatory and there's tons of help online if you need while you are building. I do recommend having a laptop or a secondary way of looking stuff up before you build a computer. Just in case you need information at your fingertips.

KSSTUDIOS @ Youtube (Best video series I found)

Chapter 1: Choosing Your Parts #1
Chapter 1: Choosing Your Parts #2
Chapter 2: Getting Started
Chapter 3: Installing The Parts
Chapter 4: Plugging It In
Chapter 5: BIOS Basics
Chapter 6: OS Installation

PCWizkid @ Youtube

Building a PC - Part 1
Building a PC - Part 2
Building a PC - Part 3

TigerDirectBlog @ Youtube

TigerDirectBlog Building a PC

I'll add more as I find useful ones, I had one I watched last night but need to find it again, it was like 6 parts.

Edited, Jul 15th 2010 8:53pm by Excenmille
#2 Jul 14 2010 at 1:18 PM Rating: Good
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Not everyone is a hobbyist you know, and frankly computers from those *big name companies* have come down a lot in price compared to the way it used to be. There aren't many who use proprietary parts anymore unless you are talking about the cheap slimline models that are only meant for word processing anyway.

Really, I don't agree that everyone who wants to play a video game should by default also be an expert IT technician. Some folks just want to buy a machine that will work.
#3 Jul 14 2010 at 1:25 PM Rating: Decent
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Nothing wrong with buying a premade system, but just remember more then likely your going to be screwed if you want to upgrade it.
#4 Jul 14 2010 at 1:26 PM Rating: Excellent
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Well I'm clumsy by nature, and from experience it's not very good to put me around such small and breakable parts. I think I will leave it for the experts thank you very much.
#5 Jul 14 2010 at 1:27 PM Rating: Excellent
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Trust me, you can have a step by step guide with pictures, video, narrated by Jesus, ..... and there are people who will still mess something up or can't figure it out. Some people just aren't as handy or tech savvy as others. It's the main reason I have so many people bug me whenever they have a computer problem. Same thing goes for many other things. If I made a guide like that on how to change your brake pads and rotors on your car, there are some people who still wouldn't be able to do it or just plain feel overwhelmed by the thought of it. Also, with the enormous variety of manufacturers and models, not all components will look or work universally the same. If something doesn't look or work exactly like it does in a guide, some people will get confused.

Edited, Jul 14th 2010 2:28pm by Harri
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#6 Jul 14 2010 at 1:29 PM Rating: Decent
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No there's nothing wrong with it. But throwing away $200.00-$500.00 depending on the system in this economy? If you got the money than go for it, but wouldn't you rather put that saved money into another video card for Crossfire/SLI? Or anything really. Just thought I'd link some videos that give you an easy reference to someone who is new to computer building.
#7 Jul 14 2010 at 1:42 PM Rating: Good
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No there's nothing wrong with it. But throwing away $200.00-$500.00 depending on the system in this economy? If you got the money than go for it, but wouldn't you rather put that saved money into another video card for Crossfire/SLI? Or anything really. Just thought I'd link some videos that give you an easy reference to someone who is new to computer building.


I built my own PC I am just saying for the people who would just rather let some one else do the work and have a nice warrenty with their system, then thats ok too. My cousin just bought a bad to the bone Alienware that I could have built for around $2200 he paid $2,800. But he has a 3 year warrenty any thing happens and they come fix it for free. No waiting around and fooling with RMA's ect. To each their own I guess!
#8 Jul 14 2010 at 1:59 PM Rating: Good
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You don't need to be tech savvy to be handy.

My father used to be a mechanic, and is currently a locksmith/safe tech. he knows his way around a computer, but I'm pretty sure that if I asked him to differentiate a SO-DIMM from SDRAM or a SATA device from an IDE device, he's probably just be making educated guesses. Regardless, he's fairly intelligent and I'm confident that despite a lack of experience, if I gave him a bunch of computer parts, he would be able to put it together without too much input from a guide. The man has built two sheds, a deck, and when I was younger, a clubhouse, all from scratch; a computer can't be harder than that.

Now conversely, we have my mother. She's far from unintelligent, but she's more of a numbers/data person. She's quite good at accounting, planning, creating... horrible at "handiwork" though. At one point in life, she was managing 10 different bank accounts for a number of family members. She still tracks her and my father's medical records, business statements (S-corp), taxes, bills, etc. When it comes to worldly advice, she's usually the first person I'll go to for a second opinion. When it comes to actually physically assembling something more complex than putting batteries in a remote, don't even think about it. Connecting a DVD player to a TV with RCA cables was too confusing for her and she had to hand that off to my father and I.

In the end, assembling a computer has little to do with being "a computer genius", and more with being physically handy. If you've ever assembled a model car/dinosaur or built an elaborate science project or jigsaw puzzle, or even replaced your own brakes on your car... then you might want to consider giving it a shot.

Conversely, if you find yourself needing to rely on an instruction manual to plug in a toaster or (to cite a previous example) a DVD player... then perhaps you would indeed be better off buying one off the shelf.

I do conclude this post by informing you that, when it comes to a gaming rig, the price of ignorance is indeed steep; you can knock 10-30% off the price by building a system yourself in most cases. But if you're not really handy and don't know anyone who is, then that is the route you're stuck with.

To point: I know I could save myself a lot of money if I knew how to change my own oil, instead of paying someone to do it for me. Regardless, I do pay someone because I don't like getting my hands dirty. Price of ignorance.
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#9 Jul 14 2010 at 2:13 PM Rating: Excellent
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Pros and Cons of building your own.
Been building computers myself since I was.. 10 or so, cant remember its been a decade or two. Anyway, I personaly do enjoy building them, I love electronics. That being said, i still will purchase my pc's alot of times instead of building. As TheBSTguy has mentioned, warantee. If your in an older house that can get some power surges, (surge protectors don't always work :( ) or in an area with alot if electrical storms or.. well lots of reasons, warantees are a good thing for sure.

Good bonus to doing it yourself,is the reward for one, having something run you built. Cheeper most of the time (not always). educational too, if you take apart an old computer that you really dotn care what happens to it(this is for thoes who have never done this before). take a peice out, put it back (with power dissconected of course). then start is up again, or can leave the peice out to see what happens. Did this alot with an old computer when I was a kid, worked quite well and was fun.

And yes the parts and DEFINATLY durable, static electricity and water on the parts are an exception, magnets and lose wires are bad.

There are many reasons no to build your own PC. But for thoes who want to try Excenmille's post here even though it looks like hes saying "your stupid of you cant do this" But i dont think its ment that way, he is right on a few things for sure. If you know what your doing or are willing to learn, expect mistakes at first but it is quite simple after you get used to it, its like riding a bike . :)



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#10 Jul 14 2010 at 2:18 PM Rating: Decent
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I've built my own rig and I disagree with the OP. If you glance at the forum and see the amount of people that have no clue about anything related to computers you'll realize some people just can't handle the process. Putting the rig together is easy enough but I can see people not getting it right and completely ******** their computer, especially when it comes to the power supply. After that if you happen to have any problems that needs to be fixed on the bios that would completely blow their mind...especially since you can't use a mouse.
#11 Jul 14 2010 at 2:22 PM Rating: Decent
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I just bought an xps 9000 for ffxiv, but I'm hoping when I get back from my next deployment to splurge on a new pc built from scratch.
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#12 Jul 14 2010 at 2:25 PM Rating: Good
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I can't be bothered building one myself. It's too much of a hassle if it breaks down. Having to do diagnostics yourself is not good.

But I'll probably buy one from a shop where I can choose most of the parts myself.
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#13 Jul 14 2010 at 2:52 PM Rating: Good
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Quote:
No there's nothing wrong with it. But throwing away $200.00-$500.00 depending on the system in this economy? If you got the money than go for it, but wouldn't you rather put that saved money into another video card for Crossfire/SLI? Or anything really. Just thought I'd link some videos that give you an easy reference to someone who is new to computer building.


Actually most computer companies now let you pick your own parts and they assemble it for you. This usually costs somewhere between $50-$100.

Gets you the computer you want and saves you tons of time reading guides AND there is 0 chance of something breaking in the process since they do it and if something doesn't work it's their problem... not yours.

I dunno... that's an excuse and a really good one.
#14 Jul 14 2010 at 2:54 PM Rating: Good
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I've compared 1) building my own from newegg parts purchased separately, 2) having a custom building do it for me for $25 surcharge, and 3) buying an HP. When you get down to it, the price difference is negligible if you time #3 properly.
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#15 Jul 14 2010 at 3:04 PM Rating: Default
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Great replies. Well, I was just showing that you don't have to be technologically minded to build one. Some people have the extra money for it, others don't. The Warranty is a very good point. However each piece usually has a warranty for a year and some even a lifetime, guess it depends on what you are buying. Dell/HP/big companies usually come to your house to repair it etc.

Speaking about Newegg, apparently the case I got came without a side panel lol. So now I get to wait 1 week for that to get shipped to me. On the other hand the case is sold out now, seems to be phased out and I just got lucky getting it with a 600w PSU combination. Rest of my parts should come in tomorrow but I'll probably still run my PC without the side panel til it gets here.

But yeah, there's just something unique about building it yourself. And as for power surges and stuff, surge protectors are good for that you know :P Get one with a telephone line/cable line/cat5 cable input as well. It's what I own. I live in Florida so I know all about thunderstorms.

Edited, Jul 14th 2010 5:09pm by Excenmille
#16 Jul 14 2010 at 3:06 PM Rating: Excellent
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It's so much easier now than the old days. I remember having to set IRQs via jumpers on the motherboard. +1 to those who know wtf I'm talking about.
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#17 Jul 14 2010 at 3:15 PM Rating: Good
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AngusX wrote:
It's so much easier now than the old days. I remember having to set IRQs via jumpers on the motherboard. +1 to those who know wtf I'm talking about.


I know what an IRQ is and I know what setting jumpers refers to, but I don't remember ever having jumpers that assigned IRQs; that was usually done in the BIOS. Jumpers were usually for voltage, bus speed, cache size, setting HDs to master/slave/CSEL, that sort of thing.
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#18 Jul 14 2010 at 3:15 PM Rating: Good
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AngusX wrote:
It's so much easier now than the old days. I remember having to set IRQs via jumpers on the motherboard. +1 to those who know wtf I'm talking about.


LMAO! Almost forgot about thoes. I think i may have an old film container with some jumpers in it somewhere. I always had spares :P

For thoes who dont know what jumpers are,, well ya dont really need to know but ill tell ya anyway. Basicly its a peice of plastic, rectangular with metal inside in order to tell the currents what pins to connect to, basicly you gotta put them on 2 pins that are side by side .. yeah this is useless info but still,,, ahh the memorys. Used them on hard drives too in order to do slave/master .. no not S&M stuff :P
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#19 Jul 14 2010 at 5:54 PM Rating: Good
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Hooray for dip switches!!

Many many moons ago, I was able to build a PC without much problem. I think my personal trepidation comes from the fact that I haven't done such a great job of keeping up with the times. If you asked me to build an old school PC with all the things you've mentioned above, I'd have no problem. I feel a bit obsolete in my own knowledge. This is why I decided to get a run of the mill big box PC from Fry's. I feel that the money I spent on it (about $1k) will fulfill all my PC needs for at least the next 7 years or so, which is about how long my previous PC lasted.

My wife uses the PC for her stuff, and I use my consoles for gaming. As busy as life can be, I just find it much easier to drop $300 every 5-6 years for a new console, rather than needing to spend so much of my time keeping up with PC trends.

Edited, Jul 14th 2010 4:59pm by LebargeX
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#20 Jul 14 2010 at 6:07 PM Rating: Decent
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As busy as life can be, I just find it much easier to drop $300 every 5-6 years for a new console, rather than needing to spend so much of my time keeping up with PC trends.
I built a $2800 PC tower over 7 years ago. 4 years ago I sold it to my aunts boyfriend and guess what. The only thing he had to replace was the power supply and he still uses it to play WOW. That being said if you build a quality PC from the start it will last you years as well!
#21 Jul 14 2010 at 6:11 PM Rating: Decent
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I would love to build my own PC one of these days, however what makes me nervous is what happens if I break/improperly install a really nice graphics card or something? Or the motherboard? I have shaky hands and I really would rage hard if that happened...

For my next PC though I really plan on building it myself. I have tons of tech-savvy friends who can stand over my shoulder and make sure I don't fudge anything up... videos on youtube aren't enough for me
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#22 Jul 14 2010 at 6:13 PM Rating: Default
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Quote:
I would love to build my own PC one of these days, however what makes me nervous is what happens if I break/improperly install a really nice graphics card or something? Or the motherboard? I have shaky hands and I really would rage hard if that happened...
Not only do you have to worry about breaking stuff but you have to make sure you have the right drivers. I picked up 20FPS just by updating my drivers!
#23 Jul 14 2010 at 6:29 PM Rating: Good
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You can't expect the average "John Q User" to build their own machine. Let's face it. Most of the masses barely know how to USE a computer, much less how to maintain the file system [disk cleanup, defrag, etc] or [Altaana forbid] troubleshooting problems/errors/incompatibilities.

Add to that the hardware issues of static, proper motherboard mounting. . .and then expecting them to understand BIOS?

They want to turn it on and have it work. They don't want to mess with it at all if it doesn't, and this is why I have a job. ;)

And in all honesty, it's 6 or 1/2 dozen of the other between buying or building if you know what you're doing. O/C really isn't a HUGE argument for BYO, b/c at this point there's really nothing that's going to tax your CPU [FFXI benchmark limitations are mostly GFX, as I understand it]. In addition, FREE OEM COPY OF WINDOWS. If you're sneaky, unethical, and know what you're doing, it can even be any version [home premium, ultimate] that you want.

[disclaimer: Poster does not advocate violation of EULA, copyright, US laws or pending trade agreements. Poster is merely making a hypothetical point. ]

Sure, you have a better built machine as a home built, but odds are you can get a better deal on an OEM, and have money left over to upgrade the two things that will matter most in your machine. . . PSU and GFX card.

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#24 Jul 14 2010 at 6:29 PM Rating: Decent
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imperialvulture wrote:
I would love to build my own PC one of these days, however what makes me nervous is what happens if I break/improperly install a really nice graphics card or something? Or the motherboard? I have shaky hands and I really would rage hard if that happened...

For my next PC though I really plan on building it myself. I have tons of tech-savvy friends who can stand over my shoulder and make sure I don't fudge anything up... videos on youtube aren't enough for me


For the motherboard, first you have to install standoffs (they look like this) into the case at 9-10 spots. They keep the motherboard from touching the actual case (which, if it was on, would be bad). then you set the motherboard on top of them, line up the standoffs with the holes in teh board and ***** them into place. Firmly tighten all screws; don't overtighten.

In terms of the video card, RAM, and processor, there's really only one way it can possibly be connected; if you're trying to do it wrong, it will very obviously not work. It should snap into place correctly with little effort and virtually no pressure applied. If you feel like you're trying to force it, you're doing it wrong.

Ditto for pretty much every cable; most cables are what is called "physically keyed" meaning there is only one possible way to plug them in. Again, unless you're putting your whole body into jamming something into place, it's practically impossible to ***** it up. The only exception to this are floppy drives; it -is- possible to plug a floppy drive cable in upside down if you don't know that the red end needs to go on the same side as the power connection (typically the left). Most people don't use floppy drives anymore though, so you'd likely never need to know this.

The only real catch is CPU heatsink/fan assemblies. Sometimes they won't snap into place as nicely as you'd like and you might have to apply a little more force than you're comfortable with. Usually they'll snap into place just like everything else, but depending on the design, I've found myself swearing at them and having to throw a lot more pressure into them to get them to firmly snap into place. Very important to make sure they're firmly connected though, otherwise your CPU goes snap, crackle, pop and is toast.

Most obviously, but most importantly, don't plug the power in until everything is connected.

Really, once you do it, you'll find that it's all a lot easier and far less daunting than it sounds.

There's nothing wrong with having someone who "knows what they're doing" guide you or look over your shoulder though.

Edited, Jul 14th 2010 8:30pm by Mikhalia
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#25 Jul 14 2010 at 6:48 PM Rating: Decent
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The mounting of CPU to motherboard part is definitely the riskiest step. The rest is just this wire plug into this hole, etc...

I personally don't recommend non tech people to do it, since I nearly ***** up the CPU when I replaced my bad motherboard. The thermal compound is messy too.

Aren't there pre-assembled motherboard + cpu combo out there?
#26 Jul 14 2010 at 6:52 PM Rating: Decent
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The first rig I ever built, I didn't. I know this doesn't make much sense, but bare with me. I had an old emachines that I bought around the 2nd year XI was in NA (so my wife could play on the PS2). The machine was ok but I was lagging often, which made the game unenjoyable. So I started reading and doing research. I eventually got brave enough to open my pc and google the components so I knew exactly what I had and what was compatable. From there came a lot more research and I ended up upgrading the video card and memory. I was very proud at what I had learned (it isn't much, but I felt accomplished). After a year or so it stopped working. It wouldn't turn on at all so I checked my first thought, which was the power supply. Sure enough, it had that yummy burnt electronic smeell. More reading ensued. I ordered a power supply and installed it myself. I marked each plug on the new PS to make sure everything was going where it was supposed to. After about 30 minutes I was up and running again. After another year, I decided to try upgrading the CPU and Mobo. I found a decent set that was compatable with the other components I upgraded and went after it. I basically built the entire machine in an old emachines case. Since then, I have built 2 rigs for myself, began OC'ing, and, as of yeaterday evening, built 7 total for others (for a very small fee...I enjoy it so I didn't charge them very much at all). I'm also working towards my Bachelor's in IT now, all because I decided to open my cheap, old, emachines case (which I still have ^^ )


If you guys are considering trying to buy a budget machine thats pre-fab'ed by Dell, HP, and so-on, then more power to you and I wish you my sincerest best ^^. Just please remember, as many on this forum have preached, that you will want to find a machine that is upgradable. I wouldn't worry about bios being unlocked unless you plan on trying to OC. There are a variety of pre-built machines on newegg, tigerdirect, and many other websites. Just remember, upgrading will be an issue in the future, and most of the machines under $600 will need a video card upgrade soon if you plan on playing XIV. Also remember, a large card wont fit in the cases :)
#27 Jul 14 2010 at 6:52 PM Rating: Good
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Quote:
Aren't there pre-assembled motherboard + cpu combo out there?
No but if you call your local PC shop they will usually do it for a small fee.
#28 Jul 14 2010 at 6:55 PM Rating: Good
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sarsha2 wrote:
The mounting of CPU to motherboard part is definitely the riskiest step. The rest is just this wire plug into this hole, etc...

I personally don't recommend non tech people to do it, since I nearly ***** up the CPU when I replaced my bad motherboard. The thermal compound is messy too.

Aren't there pre-assembled motherboard + cpu combo out there?


Monarch Computer used to pre-assemble and test CPU/Motherboard when purchased together, as well as any other parts that plugged into it (RAM, GPU, etc), for a nominal fee (like 15-20 bucks).

Sadly, they got shut down for tax evasion, so they're no longer an option.

If you have a local parts store like a Fry's or a Microcenter, maybe you can ask them if they offer the service. I wouldn't try asking a Best Buy/Staples though.
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#29 Jul 14 2010 at 8:35 PM Rating: Decent
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I was planning on making my own computer, but it'll have to wait. I'm not going to kill myself coming up for the money, which is already really stressful, and then undertake building a PC for XIV that has to work in a very short timeframe, when I've never tried this sort of thing in the past.

If anything goes wrong and I can't play, I would want to drive off a bridge.. In a year or two, after I've gone from a mediocre pre-built PC to PS3, I'm sure I'll start building a PC myself; hopefully a really good one.

Edited, Jul 14th 2010 10:36pm by Coyohma
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#30 Jul 15 2010 at 5:53 AM Rating: Excellent
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The "safest" way for you to build a computer for the first time is to find an old computer that no one uses anymore, take it apart, and rebuild it. Plug it in and make sure it works. Do this over and over a few times. If something breaks, no worries. It's an unused computer.

Find another old, unused, computer. Do the same thing to this one.

After rebuilding 2-3 different systems, you'll be amazed why you didn't do this sooner.
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#31 Jul 15 2010 at 6:24 AM Rating: Decent
I bought my PC long ago in 1996 from dell running win98 then another with XP.

In 2008 i made an investment and decided to build my own from scratch and its super powerful.
QX9650 Quad Extreme edition @3.0ghz at stock speed.
8GB Ram, Vista64, Asus Maximus 2 mobo, 1100 Watt modular psu, Zalmann 9700 cpu fan, Asus trifan HD4870X2.
Nothing stops this beast yet.

Now they have much stronger PCs for way less.

The thing is building a PC, buying a somewhat customizable one from places like Dell, Gateway or IBM, or buying a custom built PC as if you were to build one yourself.

Check here:
http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/
http://www.ibuypower.com/

The belong to Dell now but also check out:
http://www.alienware.com/

If you building one yourself try for the parts at tigerdirect or newegg.com.

Never buy a PC from a store like best buy or whatever unless you don't intend to do some serious gaming.

Edited, Jul 15th 2010 8:25am by Illicious
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#32 Jul 15 2010 at 9:39 AM Rating: Good
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Mikhalia wrote:
AngusX wrote:
It's so much easier now than the old days. I remember having to set IRQs via jumpers on the motherboard. +1 to those who know wtf I'm talking about.


I know what an IRQ is and I know what setting jumpers refers to, but I don't remember ever having jumpers that assigned IRQs; that was usually done in the BIOS. Jumpers were usually for voltage, bus speed, cache size, setting HDs to master/slave/CSEL, that sort of thing.


I've never had to deal with IRQ jumpers on the motherboard, but I have had to muck around with them on expansion cards. Like the older sound blasters, which had jumpers for I/O port number, IRQ line, and DMA channel.
#33 Jul 15 2010 at 10:12 AM Rating: Decent
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Don't mean to bump my thread, well maybe I do :) I finally found the videos that are probably the best I've seen for building a computer and I have added them. I recommend it to anyone that is new or even expert at building a computer. It makes for a nice refresher course. Good luck to everyone building their system! Got my parts in today, will be putting it together shortly. Just sucks that the case came with a missing right side panel but I can just cut cardboard up for a temporary solution while that side panel is being shipped by itself.
#34 Jul 15 2010 at 10:26 AM Rating: Excellent
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Oh believe me, I have one good excuse and that's me. I'm a total computer jinx.
#35 Jul 15 2010 at 10:59 AM Rating: Good
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Pikko wrote:
Oh believe me, I have one good excuse and that's me. I'm a total computer jinx.


As I mentioned in a post; building computers doesn't require computer knowledge so much as it requires someone who is handy at building things in general; puzzles, models, that sort of thing. I've seen your bento boxes. If you can do -that-, I'm pretty confident that you could build a computer if you put your mind to it :)

It's daunting at first, but it's a lot easier than it sounds like it would be.
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#36 Jul 15 2010 at 12:51 PM Rating: Good
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I think what it really comes down to is what your personal interests are. I'm interested in gaming. Using a console to do so makes it very easy for me to do just that. I guess at the end of the day I'm just not that interested in putting a PC together from scratch any longer. It just doesn't do it for me. Having the skill doesn't always mean you're going to have the desire to use it.
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#37 Jul 15 2010 at 1:02 PM Rating: Good
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I don't think it is the actual assembly of the rig that gets people in trouble.

It is the troubleshooting when things go awry. If someone is inexperienced with computers, they are going to have a hard time figuring out if a part is DOA, and which one iti s, when they can't boot up the build.
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#38 Jul 15 2010 at 1:11 PM Rating: Decent
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Yeah, finding that problem can be really annoying. It could take several hours. And it's pretty common for -something- to be wrong by the time you boot your system for the first time.

I remember there has only been ONE system that I've built that had absolutely -nothing- wrong when I booted it for the first time. All other systems had something wrong. A loose cord, etc.
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#39 Jul 15 2010 at 2:13 PM Rating: Good
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Mikhalia wrote:
Pikko wrote:
Oh believe me, I have one good excuse and that's me. I'm a total computer jinx.


As I mentioned in a post; building computers doesn't require computer knowledge so much as it requires someone who is handy at building things in general; puzzles, models, that sort of thing. I've seen your bento boxes. If you can do -that-, I'm pretty confident that you could build a computer if you put your mind to it :)

It's daunting at first, but it's a lot easier than it sounds like it would be.
This is pretty much correct, assuming once it's all put together it boots up like it's supposed. All it takes is one piece causing some sort of incompatibility or conflict and most people will be completely lost. I did a build for a friend of my brother-in-law, and the motherboard he bought did not want to play nice with Windows 7 installer. Took quite a bit of troubleshooting before I got the **** thing to finally install correctly.
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#40 Jul 15 2010 at 5:54 PM Rating: Good
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But it really depends if you have the enthusiasm or not. There are countless guides, videos and tutorials that teach you each step. The instructions and explanations are so clear cut and dry, it's very difficult for one to make a mistake.

It's like... as easy as Connector A goes into Port A.

Some of the tutorials online are so simplified it's like a guide for dummies. If you cannot interpret or understand Connector A goes into Port A, then I'm sorry, it's not about whether if you are tech savvy or not, you're just simply stupid. Pardon the insult but it's hard to candy coat this.

We're not talking about tweaking CPU/GPU, we're not talking about running Prime95 or 3D Mark Vantage. Connecting your CPU/Motherboard/Graphics Card/Memory/HDD/ODD/Fans/Case should be really really really easy.

For example, just to make connecting things a lot easier, take a look at some of the ASUS motherboards. They have a patented technology where they give you an adapter to connect wires coming from your case. Like power/led/reset all the connectors goes on to that white piece of adapter, then you connect that adapter onto the motherboard, voila, you're done with the front bezel connections hassle free. If people don't know what I'm talking about, take a look here, or Google ASUS EZ DIY (Q-Connector).

If all else fails, and there is just no way you can assemble a rig properly by yourself... It's still cheaper to take the recommendations by others on this site. Buy the parts they recommend, so far I'm seeing a lot of recommendations from various threads that no longer make me want to punch baby whales. Lots of good suggestions from experienced folks.

After you buy all the parts off NewEgg, Directron, MWave, TigerDirect or whatever, the last resort is to take all your parts to a local computer store. Pay them $50 bucks or so and just have them do a professional installation/wiring service for you. It's still heck of a lot better off than buying from a SI (System Integrator), you get your bang for your buck so to speak.

The 3 year warranty crap is over rated. Tell me one single component in the rig that isn't at least covered for 1 year manufacturer parts and labor. A lot of the components, such as mobo, PSU, memory are carrying a much longer warranty. I've seen PSU with 7 to 10 year warranties. It makes no sense to pay for additional coverage to a SI. Unless you're just lazy and cannot be bothered to unscrew your case, unplug a component and ship it out.

Sorry if I don't sound coherent here, I'm sort of drunk while typing this.

Edited, Jul 15th 2010 4:55pm by AliensAreHere
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#41 Jul 15 2010 at 6:01 PM Rating: Good
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No but if you call your local PC shop they will usually do it for a small fee.


I'm sorry but I'd be embarrassed if I couldn't put a square on top of a square and pull a lever. That's like not knowing how to put a key the door and open it. Every one is a "Jon Q User" until you decide to teach yourself how to do something. A little knowledge can go a long way. Once you learn how to do something, you can teach someone else, or show your kid. Then the whole world becomes a little less ignorant. I find it interesting that as we're growing up all we want to do is learn. Then as we age we become more lazy and complacent with what we know. Reminds me of the old neighbor who can't figure out how to turn on his TV because he never took 5 minutes to read a manual. My father can build a car from the ground up but would scream and yell when his computer was slow or didn't know what an "input" was on a TV. I just don't get it.

Edited, Jul 15th 2010 5:05pm by GuardianFaith
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#42 Jul 15 2010 at 7:48 PM Rating: Decent
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Is it tricky switching processors?

I want to sort of do a hybrid between building my own system and working with pre-built - largely because I figure I can cut costs by buying used components and upgrading. For example - I just found this deal:

Quote:
P5Q-E Asus motherboard will accept Intel single core, dual core, and quad core processors and up to 16 gigs of ram. Currently has a dual core 3000 MHz processor and will accept two ATI PCI express video cards (Crossfire). Currently has one ATI Radeon HD 4670 video card installed with one gig of GDDR3. Hard drive is a 250gb SATA, 7200 Seagate barracuda. Comes with one stick of ram (2 gigs DDR2). Power supply is a 550 watt modular BFG. LG DVD burner. Currently has Windows 7 Ultimate installed with ESET-NOD anti virus both of which are legitimate, packaging included. WIlling to sell without the software for $350, with software for $450.


I realize that this would need to be upgraded with a better videocard for sure and probably a better processor - adding the videocard looks easy but processor? Also I wonder are there big risks associated with going this route - and would it be possible to just say add quad core and a better radeon (say 3850 or something) without having to do any other upgrades? and is this even a good deal?

Sorry to be such a n00b - I can spend more money but wouldn't mind using this as an opportunity to try to learn a new skill.

-- I think what is daunting about building a rig is not putting it together - I could handle that - what makes me nervous is stuff like "which power supply do I need?" - and "why buy this case and not another?" - like on one hand I would be so tempted to cheap out on the case but it would really suck if all my expensive gear melted into a puddle because of that, you know?



Edited, Jul 15th 2010 6:49pm by Olorinus
#43 Jul 15 2010 at 7:55 PM Rating: Good
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A few years ago when I was putting together a new system, I priced out all the parts and such on Newegg, Tigerdirect, etc and was ready to build the system myself. Just out of curiosity, I popped over to Dell and priced out an XPS system customized with the same high end video card, memory, etc that I was going to use for my scratch built system. It turns out the price difference was around 1-2%. I ended up buying the Dell, because the 20 bucks extra I paid was well worth all the potential hassle I saved putting together a new system.

If you've ever put together a system where one component had a problem and you had to spend hours and hours trouble shooting and replacing parts to figure it out, then you'll understand.

If you run out and buy a "premium" or "gaming" system then you'll pay too much, but if you go take an ordinary system and customize the components, you can wind up with a system that's very comparable and get a great deal. The pnly hassle I've ever had with the Dell is that it had a few extra programs installed that I didn't really want, and which I promptly uninstalled with no problems. Much easier to uninstall AOL or whatever than to ***** around trying to isolate a bad power supply vs bad RAM.

IMO, the best reason to build your own system is just because you enjoy it, or you just want to learn how it all goes together, or if you need some thing VERY specific that you simply can't have customized for a reasonable price.
#44 Jul 18 2010 at 9:54 PM Rating: Good
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I'd really like to build my own rig someday. My cousin is making another rig for FF XIV and he really makes me wanna do it also.

Meaby I am paranoiac or just insecure about it but when you are about to spend 1400$ on a new computer you wanna build yourself:

- First of, Compatible Parts --> I've been doing hours upon hours of research for my computer parts and compatibility issues. I actually have a build in my mind, but still feel anxious about there compatibility. More hours of research I guess. I didn't take on account my monitor last time I build something (heck of a chance I didn't order before that happen) and wouldn't be able to make FF XIV Hig res (1080p) since it was 1440x900 max. Talk about forgting one piece for compatibility check...

- Second, Parts delivering --> Most of the time I read a review or a comment about someone who build their rig, I often heard about having DOA parts right at the start. Aftwewad, it's another 1-2 weeks of waiting to finally finish your computer. Small computer shop guarantee that the parts works and often with a long term (ex.: 3 years) warranty.

- Third, Warranty --> Seriously, I found that to be quite a turn-off for computer building. Even with the Manufacturer warranty, I think you'd have to wait weeks to get the new parts, while you could only walk to that computer shop and get it fixed in a short time.

- Fourth, Building the Computer --> I've build useless computer before. I've installed a new PSU on my dinosaur. I am still afraid that, if I don't plug the right thing into the other right thing, when I press on to enter the BIOS, I would get some small flames or something like that. Your 1400$ could go buh-bye if you don't do it and don't know how to do it right. Don't laugh, I am not probably the only one thinking like that sadly.


I have a new rig in mind and already selected pieces from NewEgg. I am still running checks on the compatibility and an adapter for my VGA computer so I can install a GTX 4XX graphic card. While I will still only be able to run at 720p, I do plan to buy a new monitor later on to get my High Res. I am thinking about building it, even though I fear to somewhat lose 1400$ of parts and some weeks in the process. I don't have a big budget, but since I saw Aurelius' Journal about Custom Building (it's him right ?), I'd really wanna build it myself. Meaby my cousin can show me and help me around, so I can learn about it.

Mostly, I don't think it's all about Lazyness (**** I loved doing LEGOs (I'd still do)). It's mostly about fear to ***** up and loose 1400$ in the process.

EDIT: Static electricity isn't your friend.

Edited, Jul 18th 2010 11:55pm by MisterRandy
#45 Jul 19 2010 at 12:40 AM Rating: Good
MisterRandy wrote:
I'd really like to build my own rig someday. My cousin is making another rig for FF XIV and he really makes me wanna do it also.

Meaby I am paranoiac or just insecure about it but when you are about to spend 1400$ on a new computer you wanna build yourself:

- First of, Compatible Parts --> I've been doing hours upon hours of research for my computer parts and compatibility issues. I actually have a build in my mind, but still feel anxious about there compatibility. More hours of research I guess. I didn't take on account my monitor last time I build something (heck of a chance I didn't order before that happen) and wouldn't be able to make FF XIV Hig res (1080p) since it was 1440x900 max. Talk about forgting one piece for compatibility check...

- Second, Parts delivering --> Most of the time I read a review or a comment about someone who build their rig, I often heard about having DOA parts right at the start. Aftwewad, it's another 1-2 weeks of waiting to finally finish your computer. Small computer shop guarantee that the parts works and often with a long term (ex.: 3 years) warranty.

- Third, Warranty --> Seriously, I found that to be quite a turn-off for computer building. Even with the Manufacturer warranty, I think you'd have to wait weeks to get the new parts, while you could only walk to that computer shop and get it fixed in a short time.

- Fourth, Building the Computer --> I've build useless computer before. I've installed a new PSU on my dinosaur. I am still afraid that, if I don't plug the right thing into the other right thing, when I press on to enter the BIOS, I would get some small flames or something like that. Your 1400$ could go buh-bye if you don't do it and don't know how to do it right. Don't laugh, I am not probably the only one thinking like that sadly.


I have a new rig in mind and already selected pieces from NewEgg. I am still running checks on the compatibility and an adapter for my VGA computer so I can install a GTX 4XX graphic card. While I will still only be able to run at 720p, I do plan to buy a new monitor later on to get my High Res. I am thinking about building it, even though I fear to somewhat lose 1400$ of parts and some weeks in the process. I don't have a big budget, but since I saw Aurelius' Journal about Custom Building (it's him right ?), I'd really wanna build it myself. Meaby my cousin can show me and help me around, so I can learn about it.

Mostly, I don't think it's all about Lazyness (**** I loved doing LEGOs (I'd still do)). It's mostly about fear to ***** up and loose 1400$ in the process.

EDIT: Static electricity isn't your friend.

Edited, Jul 18th 2010 11:55pm by MisterRandy



Let's not forget: Fifth -- What to do when hardware/software configurations go wrong after you've pieced together your PC.


As has been pointed out by a lot of people already, it's not overly difficult but it's not for everyone.
#46 Jul 19 2010 at 3:16 AM Rating: Good
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Osarion, Goblin in Disguise wrote:
Let's not forget: Fifth -- What to do when hardware/software configurations go wrong after you've pieced together your PC.


As has been pointed out by a lot of people already, it's not overly difficult but it's not for everyone.


Yeah, I won't dispute that; building it is easy. On the off chance something doesn't work, that's a little trickier.

I'm always double checking behind myself as I build before I start ******** the sides of the case back on. Better to take a little extra time to make sure than to turn it on and realized you forgot to connect the power switch to the motherboard, and have to unplug it and take the side off again... heh.

EDIT: Or, in the case of what I was doing earlier, forget to ***** the bottom of the DVD burner back on. Had to take off a faceplate from a DVD burner I took out of an emachines I had laying around in my closet so that it would fit into a different faceplate for a custom rig; had to unsrew the bottom to get the faceplate off, but forgot to put the screws back in until I had reassembled it and had two screws left over. Then I forgot to ***** the front of the case on ad had to take both sides off again...

That's what happens when you rush. Take your time.

Edited, Jul 19th 2010 5:18am by Mikhalia
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#47 Jul 19 2010 at 3:21 AM Rating: Default
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my opinion is, if you want a pc for gaming and you you dont want to put in the time to build your own rig, pay someone to build a custom pc for you. never buy from a big name manufacturer. there's allot of sites out there who will build you a decent custom pc for a good price, just got to be a bit carefull of cowboy sites.

Edited, Jul 19th 2010 5:23am by jamiehavok
#48 Jul 19 2010 at 3:40 AM Rating: Good
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jamiehavok wrote:
my opinion is, if you want a pc for gaming and you you dont want to put in the time to build your own rig, pay someone to build a custom pc for you. never buy from a big name manufacturer. there's allot of sites out there who will build you a decent custom pc for a good price, just got to be a bit carefull of cowboy sites.

Edited, Jul 19th 2010 5:23am by jamiehavok


****, call up a tech savvy friend of yours (like myself, if I were your friend) who enjoys building computers and ask him or her to help you pick out the parts and help you put them together (por put them together for you).

My fiancee's brother wanted a new system, was gonna pay about 1200 for it; I helped him pick out some parts to construct a rig for $850ish, and when they were delivered, I went over his place and helped/taught him how to assemble it.

I got some Taco Bell out of the deal, and as far as I was concerned, that was fine with me. I love building systems. ****, if you happen to live in the Baltimore, MD area and you need a system built (and I know who you are), you pay for the food and I'd be happy to help.

Granted, I wouldn't turn down cash, but food and soda is pretty acceptable payment for helping a friend with something I enjoy doing, as far as I'm concerned.

If you have any good friends, perhaps you can tempt them with food and drink yourself.
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#49 Jul 19 2010 at 4:38 AM Rating: Good
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My cousin's fee will probably something like that...plus 2 beers.
#50 Jul 20 2010 at 11:47 AM Rating: Good
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True that it's not as scary as it looks to build your own desktop. Parts only fit one way. :)

Now, if only I could build my own laptop, that would make me happy. I like to take my game with me since I travel a lot. /em goes off to see if it's possible.
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#51 Jul 20 2010 at 12:46 PM Rating: Good
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Courtelise wrote:
True that it's not as scary as it looks to build your own desktop. Parts only fit one way. :)

Now, if only I could build my own laptop, that would make me happy. I like to take my game with me since I travel a lot. /em goes off to see if it's possible.


It is possible to build your own laptop, but unlike desktops, not only will you not save money, but you'll probably spend -more- money building it yourself.
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