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Custom Pc wait timeFollow

#1 Jul 28 2010 at 8:18 PM Rating: Good
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so many helpful posts lately,ill try to add 1. If youre custom building a pc to order from a website, allow 3 weeks from day u order til you recieve to be safe.
Ordered mine from avadirect July 16, it doesnt look like ill get it til aug 7th or so, and its custom parts only, no paint or special wiring of any kind................ they sure better build this thing to par after this long of a wait!
#2 Jul 28 2010 at 10:09 PM Rating: Good
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I order from Newegg. Usually ships in 1-2 days and assuming I pick standard (3-5 business day) shipping, it arrives from NJ in 2-3 days, or from CA in 3-4 days.

Three weeks is... insane.
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#3 Jul 28 2010 at 11:47 PM Rating: Good
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Mikhalia wrote:
I order from Newegg. Usually ships in 1-2 days and assuming I pick standard (3-5 business day) shipping, it arrives from NJ in 2-3 days, or from CA in 3-4 days.

Three weeks is... insane.


A fully built, custom computer? I would expect it to take atleast a week, for them to put it all together, check it, etc. IDK tho, only just bought my first custom rig online from Cyberpower, ordered on 7/5 and got it on 7/16. I was quoted up to the 20th, so all was fine with me.

But to add to the OP, one shouldn't wait til the last minute if going that route regardless where you go. You want to have enough time to make sure you get what you wanted, no problems.
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#4 Jul 28 2010 at 11:58 PM Rating: Good
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LordDVS wrote:
Mikhalia wrote:
I order from Newegg. Usually ships in 1-2 days and assuming I pick standard (3-5 business day) shipping, it arrives from NJ in 2-3 days, or from CA in 3-4 days.

Three weeks is... insane.


A fully built, custom computer? I would expect it to take atleast a week, for them to put it all together, check it, etc. IDK tho, only just bought my first custom rig online from Cyberpower, ordered on 7/5 and got it on 7/16. I was quoted up to the 20th, so all was fine with me.

But to add to the OP, one shouldn't wait til the last minute if going that route regardless where you go. You want to have enough time to make sure you get what you wanted, no problems.


A week? Assembling a system, turning it on, installing an OS, installing drivers can be done in a couple hours by one guy. A day at most, and that's rounding way up. Two days is extremely generous. But a week?
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#5 Jul 29 2010 at 2:10 AM Rating: Decent
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Anything more then a couple hours to build a system is just silly. People that do it everyday can surely build a entire system in a hour, then being generous we will say 2 hours to install windows and drivers, stick it in a box and call UPS to pick it up lol.

It's been said many many times but I'll repeat it. Theres no need to pay someone to build your system, or to wait weeks for it. You can build it yourself in 3-4 hours if it's your first system your building. It's extremely simple to build a computer all you have to do is follow the 10 page instruction book that comes with your motherboard and your done.

Basic assembly:

1.) ***** 9 posts into the case (10 mins)
2.) ***** the motherboard into the 9 posts (5 mins)
3.) stick the processor in (5 mins)
4.) attach your heatsink/cooler (5 mins)
5.) install your ram (5 mins)
6.) install all the case wires to the motherboard (1 hour for a total novice, it's easy and you can't ***** it up but being totally new to it, your gonna have to read and follow the directions and search for each wire)
7.) Install hard drives / cdroms (10 mins)
8.) install power supply (5 mins)
9.) install video/sound cared (5-10 mins)
10.) connect all the power to mobo / hard drive /cdrom / etc. (30 mins for a novice at most and once again its easy you can not plug the wrong wire into the wrong part because the pins only fit where they belong. (USB/1394 being the only exception).

and then your pretty much done and now have the confidence and knowledge to replace/upgrade parts in the future. If all else fails and you get stuck somewhere there are tons of youtube videos that will take you through step by step also, which makes it impossible to get lost.

Important note: Don't take those steps as a guild, I wrote that quickly and it's 4am. I listed that info as a general guideline of how easy and quick the build is. There may be something missing or a step out of order in how you should do it, but thats not what the list is meant for, you can find plenty of videos/text files for that purpose if you need it.
#6 Jul 29 2010 at 2:40 AM Rating: Good
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Indeed I've looked at quite a few well-detailed walkthroughs/tutorials. Lots of good information out there. Being an overall negative person though, I focus on a few posts where someone was building their 1st computer, did crap wrong and fried stuff. Seeing as I'll probably already be putting the parts on some sort of payment plan, even the slightest chance I could ***** up like that makes me consider paying someone to do it. Despite knowing they're ripping me off.

I would feel so much more comfortable about it if I could buy some of the cheapest parts I could find and make that system first as a practice run. Hmm, that's not a bad idea. I'm also remembered of a lot times I've put furniture together...I always seem to do one or more steps back asswards. Or skip a step I feel is unnecessary just to find out later why it was suggested earlier. That doesn't give me a whole lot of confidence with more complicated(more importantly expensive) things. I'm quite sure I could do it with all the info available, but paying a little extra might be worth missing out on the stress.

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 4:41am by TwistedOwl
#7 Jul 29 2010 at 3:00 AM Rating: Good
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I'm sure if I've used the components before and know all of the parts beforehand with an electric screwdriver I could build a PC in about 10 minutes. With zip ties, maybe 15.

Loading the OS is another story; that would take an hour.

Then I would have to run a check see if everything is working right, then maybe do some stress tests.

I could build about 20 per day, but still have to install the OS and possibly test them, and if I were selling them like a company would, I would definitely test them.

Maybe you figure that there are at least hundreds on order, and that they'll have to order parts if they aren't in stock, (factor in shipping) then 3 weeks is pretty reasonable.

#8 Jul 29 2010 at 10:49 AM Rating: Decent
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I buy all of my PCs custom built. It only costs around $100 more than assembling it yourself. Most importantly to me, you get a 3 year warranty on the SYSTEM in case anything goes wrong. I have read countless threads where folks are stuck troubleshooting a problem with their PC either during a build or a few days after the build. To me, $100 is worth not dealing with the potential headache.

But 3 weeks does seem like a long time. They may not have all the parts you want in stock, and shipping alone is about a week if you only got the cheapest option. If I remember correctly, they also have a "priority build" option you pay extra for. If that is the case they need to allow time in the schedule to build PCs for customers that selected that option...and also provide a reason to select that option.

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 12:50pm by Enscheff
#9 Jul 29 2010 at 11:10 AM Rating: Good
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Quote:
A week? Assembling a system, turning it on, installing an OS, installing drivers can be done in a couple hours by one guy. A day at most, and that's rounding way up. Two days is extremely generous. But a week?


Depends on how busy the shop is and how many are ahead of you, whether they have to order parts to complete your order, whether they're just lazy and only do 1 machine a day, etc. If it goes out earlier you earn "exceptional customer satisfaction" for delivering early.

Quote:
Most importantly to me, you get a 3 year warranty on the SYSTEM in case anything goes wrong. I have read countless threads where folks are stuck troubleshooting a problem with their PC either during a build or a few days after the build.


I guess it depends on your experience in dealing with computer hardware. Personal preference, I'd rather do it myself and know it was done properly instead of trusting someone I've never met who may only make minimum wage to assemble my hardware. If I have a bad part, I can RMA it and [depending on the part] find a temporary work around solution (as opposed to sending the entire system back to the company to go through). For me, troubleshooting computer issues is not so much an aggravation as it is an opportunity to learn more about computers and the kind of issues they can have, which in turn helps me out in the real world when someone with little or no computer experience has a problem and asks me for help with it.



Edited, Jul 29th 2010 1:22pm by seneleron

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 1:22pm by seneleron
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#10 Jul 29 2010 at 11:34 AM Rating: Good
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Diggtown wrote:

Basic assembly:

1.) ***** 9 posts into the case (10 mins)
2.) ***** the motherboard into the 9 posts (5 mins)
3.) stick the processor in (5 mins)
4.) attach your heatsink/cooler (5 mins)
5.) install your ram (5 mins)
6.) install all the case wires to the motherboard (1 hour for a total novice, it's easy and you can't ***** it up but being totally new to it, your gonna have to read and follow the directions and search for each wire)
7.) Install hard drives / cdroms (10 mins)
8.) install power supply (5 mins)
9.) install video/sound cared (5-10 mins)
10.) connect all the power to mobo / hard drive /cdrom / etc. (30 mins for a novice at most and once again its easy you can not plug the wrong wire into the wrong part because the pins only fit where they belong. (USB/1394 being the only exception).


On a bit of a tangent:

I find that it's usually easier to install the CPU, heat-sink and ram before the motherboard is installed in the case. Especially with Intel's crappy push-pin system for heat-sink retention...
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#11 Jul 29 2010 at 11:44 AM Rating: Good
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If I wimp out of the DIY option I'll use a local shop to do the building so if(hopefully there wouldn't be) there are issues it wouldn't be a whole sending the computer back through the mail ordeal. Still money I could avoid paying though. Of course when I checked on the pricing the chick was like "They'll want to install your OS for you too so they can test everything", to which I replied "To tack on 2-3 hours of labor right? I'll pass on that."
#12 Jul 29 2010 at 1:22 PM Rating: Good
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Pickins wrote:
Diggtown wrote:

Basic assembly:

1.) ***** 9 posts into the case (10 mins)
2.) ***** the motherboard into the 9 posts (5 mins)
3.) stick the processor in (5 mins)
4.) attach your heatsink/cooler (5 mins)
5.) install your ram (5 mins)
6.) install all the case wires to the motherboard (1 hour for a total novice, it's easy and you can't ***** it up but being totally new to it, your gonna have to read and follow the directions and search for each wire)
7.) Install hard drives / cdroms (10 mins)
8.) install power supply (5 mins)
9.) install video/sound cared (5-10 mins)
10.) connect all the power to mobo / hard drive /cdrom / etc. (30 mins for a novice at most and once again its easy you can not plug the wrong wire into the wrong part because the pins only fit where they belong. (USB/1394 being the only exception).


On a bit of a tangent:

I find that it's usually easier to install the CPU, heat-sink and ram before the motherboard is installed in the case. Especially with Intel's crappy push-pin system for heat-sink retention...


Funny, I always do Standoffs > Motherboard & connect to case > HD/optical > PSU > RAM > video > CPU/heatsink > cable management > done.

There's no "wrong order" to do it in, really. But everyone does it differently.

But back on-topic: Even if you don't feel comfortable building it yourself, get a friend who knows how to build systems to help you. I've said before that I love helping people assemble systems; I'll do it for food and soda.
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#13 Jul 29 2010 at 4:41 PM Rating: Decent
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I would love to have someone knowledgeable guide me through a build just for the learning experience. I guess the only real aversion I have to building my own is the fear I will ***** it up, no matter how low the probability may be.

I have bad luck, so anything that could go wrong during my first build will certainly go wrong.
#14 Jul 29 2010 at 4:47 PM Rating: Good
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Enscheff wrote:
I would love to have someone knowledgeable guide me through a build just for the learning experience. I guess the only real aversion I have to building my own is the fear I will ***** it up, no matter how low the probability may be.

I have bad luck, so anything that could go wrong during my first build will certainly go wrong.


Ive taught people how to do it before, And really its as simpil as square block goes in square hole. If you have a freind that has done it before have them over and show you a few things then try it yourself. once ya do it its preety easy :)
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#15 Jul 29 2010 at 5:05 PM Rating: Decent
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It's not to hard to do if you have quality parts. Like many others have said its almost like lego's. The only challenging part is the cpu installation part and maybe putting the motherboard into the case. Also with the way some of the nicer cases like the HAF932 you have holes precut to run wires behind the motherboard. That makes it almost impossible to do bad cable management.
#16 Jul 29 2010 at 5:51 PM Rating: Good
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Assume that you've never seen any of these parts:

Motherboard - unless it's a micro ATX, it can only fit in the case two ways. Micro ATX can fit in the case 4 ways. Once you look at where the rear ports are on the motherboard and where the back of the case is, it's fairly obvious which way it needs to go in. If you don't know that you need to replace the faceplate on the back that comes with the case with the one that comes with your motherboard, that might confuse you at first. Getting it to snap into place can be a pain.

RAM - There are a couple slots it seems like this could fit into, but upon closer inspection, it's more obvious it won't fit into PCI or PCI-E slots. It only fits into RAM slots, and it only fits one way, so if you can't get it to snap in, you can tell you have it upside down.

Optical drive - Depending on your case, you might have to remove the front panel to get it in. Can be a bit confusing. It very obviously only slides in one way though (right side up, tray facing out).

Hard Drive - This can fit into one of two places (HD bay or FDD bay) and it's more obvious that it goes in an HD bay. If you don't think about it, you might put it in backwards, but you'll figure it out you did it wrong when you realize that you're trying to plug it in and you can't get to the plugs. You could potentially put it in upside down, I guess, but it wouldn't matter.

Processor - very obviously only pops in one way; look at the pins and it should be apparent, might have to stare at it to figure it out. Less obvious is the fact that you have to pull the bar up, put the CPU in, and then close the bar.

CPU heatsink - depending on the form factor, it can either go in one of four orientations (none of which are wrong) or one of two orientations (again, neither of which are really wrong). Pay attention to where the CPU fan's 4 pin plug connects to the motherboard and just so long as it reaches, you should be okay. Newbie warning in that sometimes it feels like you REALLY have to apply an assload of pressure to get a snug fit, sometimes you feel like you're going to break it. I could see a newbie getting befuddled/pressured here by the "I don't want to break it, but I can't get it to tighten" feeling.

PSU - can only go in one of two ways. If there's a fan on the bottom, upside down is more obvious (when the fan is pointing the wrong way). The fact that the ***** holes are in more of a trapezoid than a rhombus makes the positioning more apparent. Again, there's only two ways it can fit and if you try to ***** it in the wrong way, you'll figure it out pretty fast.

Video card - there are maybe two places it looks like it can plug into (PCI or PCI-E slot) but upon closer inspection, the PCI-E slot is the correct answer. It doesn't matter which PCI-E slot you plug it into; all of them will work. Don't forget to take the back plates off of the case.

SATA cables - only plug in one way. If it doesn't fit, you're doing it wrong.

Power cables - also only plug in one way. Again, if it doesn't fit, you're doing it wrong.
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#17 Jul 29 2010 at 6:02 PM Rating: Decent
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Puppy1 wrote:
Enscheff wrote:
I would love to have someone knowledgeable guide me through a build just for the learning experience. I guess the only real aversion I have to building my own is the fear I will ***** it up, no matter how low the probability may be.

I have bad luck, so anything that could go wrong during my first build will certainly go wrong.


Ive taught people how to do it before, And really its as simpil as square block goes in square hole. If you have a freind that has done it before have them over and show you a few things then try it yourself. once ya do it its preety easy :)


Exactly this. It is like lego with a few cables. People get deterred by the price of the lego pieces, but I built mine and had it running in less then 2 hours on monday. Saved a bundle too being able to bargain hunt specific parts I wanted.
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#18 Jul 29 2010 at 7:24 PM Rating: Decent
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After having to wait this long, I wish i would of built it myself, even though I have never done any pc build, im ok with that kinda stuff and would of been cautious and easily gotten it done in 1 day.

A week ago, i would of said to people with choice between build or buy, for 1000$ pc, buy and have expert build it, and for under a grand , try it yourself to save extra money. But this wait time from the so called 'best site' have really persuaded me otherwise.
#19 Jul 29 2010 at 7:34 PM Rating: Good
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Maybe I'll take a look at the booklets when I get the parts and be tempted to go for it. See if I can ******-proof the area beforehand. Totally ruins the fine speech I gave on why dopes like me should pay someone else to do it. I still may wimp out and let the pros do it anyway though. I feel like Zell now, Seifer would call me chicken-wuss.
#20 Jul 29 2010 at 8:19 PM Rating: Good
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Well, the main thing is to just sit down and do it. Touch your hand to a piece of metal if you have to get up and sit down again, lest you get some static electricity and shock something.

Again, worst case, see if you have any friends who know their **** about computers and know how to build them.

As a corollary to that though, if you're gonna trust someone else to do it, trust someone who has built THEIR OWN computer. If the person helping you owns a retail computer, there may be a reason they haven't built it themselves. It's bad enough to **** something up yourself and be mad at yourself for it; it's another to have your friend **** it up and be mad at your friend.
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#21 Jul 29 2010 at 8:29 PM Rating: Good
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Right on, the one friend I thought would be the best help turned out to be a regret. Filling my head with all the potential negative outcomes. No carpet in this apartment so I guess that helps static-wise. And if I go that route I'll prolly toss a little toolkit into my newegg order that'll have one of those wrist straps in case I get paranoid.
#22 Jul 29 2010 at 8:34 PM Rating: Good
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TwistedOwl wrote:
Right on, the one friend I thought would be the best help turned out to be a regret. Filling my head with all the potential negative outcomes. No carpet in this apartment so I guess that helps static-wise. And if I go that route I'll prolly toss a little toolkit into my newegg order that'll have one of those wrist straps in case I get paranoid.


Static, While your computer is plugged in touch a metal peice on teh back of youtr pwer supply, then unplug it. Power supplys 3rd prong isa ground, and it will ground any static you have built up when you touch it.
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#23 Jul 29 2010 at 8:52 PM Rating: Good
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Puppy1 wrote:
TwistedOwl wrote:
Right on, the one friend I thought would be the best help turned out to be a regret. Filling my head with all the potential negative outcomes. No carpet in this apartment so I guess that helps static-wise. And if I go that route I'll prolly toss a little toolkit into my newegg order that'll have one of those wrist straps in case I get paranoid.


Static, While your computer is plugged in touch a metal peice on teh back of youtr pwer supply, then unplug it. Power supplys 3rd prong isa ground, and it will ground any static you have built up when you touch it.


I just touch a random piece of metal on the case. Also, you shouldn't be connecting anything to a computer with it plugged in.

I know I'm guilty of doing it, but I also know I -shouldn't- :)
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#24 Jul 29 2010 at 9:32 PM Rating: Decent
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Speaking of computer parts, where does a sound card figure in? I almost never see it mentioned when someone goes over PC components. For e.g., the options I'm seeing for the Dell XPS 9000 are either THX TruStudio PC, or Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Xtreme Audio. I'm sure there are better ones out there, but that's not my main point here.
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#25 Jul 29 2010 at 9:36 PM Rating: Good
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Sound card requirements are um.. well if it runs with direct x9.0 sound compatible its fine, aka preety much anything.
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#26 Jul 29 2010 at 9:38 PM Rating: Decent
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Unless you're a major audiophile, the sound card built into the motherboard will almost always suffice, which is why no one talks about them as separate components.
#27 Jul 29 2010 at 9:38 PM Rating: Decent
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Puppy1 wrote:
Sound card requirements are um.. well if it runs with direct x9.0 sound compatible its fine, aka preety much anything.

I see.. But what I meant was more along the lines of, "do you need one?" Since I never see people mention it.

Edit - oh, thanks Majivo. Didn't know all motherboards had one built-in.

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 11:39pm by Coyohma
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#28 Jul 29 2010 at 9:47 PM Rating: Decent
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Same deal for network cards, by the way. The onboard one is almost always sufficient, unless you live in some part of the US which is getting speeds higher than your standard onboard card can handle (and if you don't know whether you live in that area, then you do not live in that area). I hear you might need to use a dedicated sound card to do 5.1 surround sound, but I'm not sure if that's true or not because I've never tried it.
#29 Jul 29 2010 at 10:12 PM Rating: Good
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Quote:
I just touch a random piece of metal on the case. Also, you shouldn't be connecting anything to a computer with it plugged in.

I know I'm guilty of doing it, but I also know I -shouldn't- :)


You're still guilty, you should be using an anti-static wrist strap :P
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#30 Jul 29 2010 at 10:16 PM Rating: Good
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Coyohma wrote:
Puppy1 wrote:
Sound card requirements are um.. well if it runs with direct x9.0 sound compatible its fine, aka preety much anything.

I see.. But what I meant was more along the lines of, "do you need one?" Since I never see people mention it.

Edit - oh, thanks Majivo. Didn't know all motherboards had one built-in.

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 11:39pm by Coyohma


If you have one that dosnt have a built in, They can be preety cheep or pricy, second hand shop could have one too.
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#31 Jul 29 2010 at 10:17 PM Rating: Good
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seneleron wrote:
Quote:
I just touch a random piece of metal on the case. Also, you shouldn't be connecting anything to a computer with it plugged in.

I know I'm guilty of doing it, but I also know I -shouldn't- :)


You're still guilty, you should be using an anti-static wrist strap :P


Never used one, never fried a card.. brain cells on the other hand....
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#32 Jul 29 2010 at 11:59 PM Rating: Good
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Majivo wrote:
Same deal for network cards, by the way. The onboard one is almost always sufficient, unless you live in some part of the US which is getting speeds higher than your standard onboard card can handle (and if you don't know whether you live in that area, then you do not live in that area). I hear you might need to use a dedicated sound card to do 5.1 surround sound, but I'm not sure if that's true or not because I've never tried it.


Nearly all motherboards have gigabit Ethernet onboard. The only time you should need an extra NIC is if you're trying to use the system for more advanced purposes, such as setting a system up as a router, or if you need to connect to a network that doesn't use RJ-45 connections (COAX network for example), or if your onboard NIC dies.
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#33 Jul 30 2010 at 12:01 AM Rating: Good
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seneleron wrote:
Quote:
I just touch a random piece of metal on the case. Also, you shouldn't be connecting anything to a computer with it plugged in.

I know I'm guilty of doing it, but I also know I -shouldn't- :)


You're still guilty, you should be using an anti-static wrist strap :P


I've never used one and never had any issues. *shrug* To be honest, I've never met anyone who said they got some special benefit from one that touching your finger to metal didn't solve.
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#34 Jul 30 2010 at 12:02 AM Rating: Good
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Puppy1 wrote:
Coyohma wrote:
Puppy1 wrote:
Sound card requirements are um.. well if it runs with direct x9.0 sound compatible its fine, aka preety much anything.

I see.. But what I meant was more along the lines of, "do you need one?" Since I never see people mention it.

Edit - oh, thanks Majivo. Didn't know all motherboards had one built-in.

Edited, Jul 29th 2010 11:39pm by Coyohma


If you have one that dosnt have a built in, They can be preety cheep or pricy, second hand shop could have one too.


Just like a NIC, motherboards have onboard 5.1 audio in most cases. The only time you should need an addon card is if the onboard audio fails or if you're trying to use something better like 7.1, or if you just want a higher quality sound. To be honest, I've never had any complaints about the performance from my onboard audio.
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#35 Jul 30 2010 at 12:34 AM Rating: Good
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Who remembers back when you went to install a game and it would ask you whether you were using AdLib or SoundBlaster, etc? I almost said it wasn't that long ago... then I remembered that some of those were DOS games... Warcraft (sans-"world of"). King's Quest. Sim City.

Holy crap, I just realized that I am old.

Edited, Jul 30th 2010 2:54am by khorbin
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#36 Jul 30 2010 at 12:56 AM Rating: Good
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khorbin wrote:
Who remembers back when you went to install a game and it would ask you whether you were using AdLib or SoundBlaster, etc? I almost said it wasn't that long ago... then I remembered that some of those were DOS games... Warcraft (sans-"world of"). King's Quest. Sim City.

Holy crap, I just realized that I am old.

Edited, Jul 30th 2010 2:54am by khorbin


And when it asked if your graphics were VGA, EGA, CGA, or Tandy. And what COM port your modem was on.
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#37 Jul 30 2010 at 1:06 AM Rating: Good
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Coyohma wrote:
Speaking of computer parts, where does a sound card figure in? I almost never see it mentioned when someone goes over PC components. For e.g., the options I'm seeing for the Dell XPS 9000 are either THX TruStudio PC, or Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Xtreme Audio. I'm sure there are better ones out there, but that's not my main point here.


Sound cards are largely irrelevant nowadays.

Audio processing takes so little processing power compared to what modern CPUs are capable of that it's usually done in software, and modern motherboards generally have integrated audio devices, usually complete with digital output and 5.1 surround sound (sometimes even 7.1 surround sound).



The only reason Dell is even giving you a choice of sound cards on that PC is that the XPS 9000 is meant to be home-theater capable, and some audiophiles (aka people with more money than sense) buying it as a home theater system might want one of those cards (which are both unnecessary, since the motherboard has integrated 7.1 channel surround sound anyway).

EDIT: As I see like 8 people said basically the same thing while I was typing this out >.<

Edited, Jul 30th 2010 12:08am by BastokFL
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