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Overclocking - How easy is it for someone new?Follow

#1 Aug 07 2010 at 9:22 AM Rating: Decent
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I finally got my new PC (pre-built). I wasn't going to take a chance on building a pc, spending $100-200 more and something goes wrong.

I tested the benchmark 3 times on low and high.

Score Low: 3600-4000

High: 2500-3000

Now for what I want, this is fine. But I have heard overclocking even a little can improve performance, but I have never done it, nor do I know how to.

Here's the link if you need more info
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883227274

Desktop pc

Athlon II x4 635 (2.9GHz)
4 GB Ram
Radeon HD 5770 1gb
500GB HD

What would I need to do to overclock even a little to improve performance? Steps I need to take etc?

I know overheating can be an issue, where can I check to see what mine is, running the system to it's capabilities etc and what temperature do I want to stay below?
#2 Aug 07 2010 at 9:39 AM Rating: Good
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First, find out what motherboard it has and if it is capable of overclocking. Second, see what others have been able to overclock your processor to and if it was stock cooling or not. Most of this can be found on Google. Search for Athlon II x4 635 overclocking.

Everything is tied into the front side bus.
#3 Aug 07 2010 at 9:39 AM Rating: Good
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http://www.overclock.net/

Overclocking Tutorials at youtube.com

It's not hard. You need a bios that allows you to mess with the frequencies and voltages of your computer's components. The higher OC, the better cooling you need. You need software to monitor your hardware temps and voltages, and you need software to stress test your hardware components such as Prime95.

If you want to OC your GPU, check out GPU-Z, GPUTool, and MSI Afterburner.

Edited, Aug 7th 2010 10:41am by xXMalevolenceXx
#4 Aug 07 2010 at 9:48 AM Rating: Decent
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Thanks, I will take a look at these.
#5 Aug 07 2010 at 10:48 AM Rating: Excellent
If everything starts looking like this:
OC fail




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#6 Aug 07 2010 at 10:52 AM Rating: Good
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Sidenote: Once you overclock something, whether something goes wrong or not, you've probably voided the warranty on -everything- since you bought a prebuilt system. I'd double check before you do anything and see.

Edited, Aug 7th 2010 12:53pm by Mikhalia
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#7 Aug 07 2010 at 10:54 AM Rating: Good
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I think your scores on the benchmark arer perfectly fine for playing the game, think the benchmark is kinda screwy anyways.
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#8 Aug 07 2010 at 11:06 AM Rating: Good
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I did extensive research into overclocking because I wanted to save a few bucks on upgrades... I finally decided it's not worth the amount of time you need to put into it to do it right. In addition you'll be severely reducing the lifespan of your hardware and without a proper cooling unit, you could fry your processor or motherboard outright.

Your scores are good and I wouldn't bother trying to kill your computer over a 10k score on a FFXIV benchmark.
#9 Aug 07 2010 at 11:09 AM Rating: Good
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Oh you definitely won't get 10k; you might bump your score up by 500-1000ish or so though.
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#10 Aug 07 2010 at 11:13 AM Rating: Decent
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i advise everyone to get gamebooster, that helps some, shuts down all the processes running in the background some
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#11 Aug 07 2010 at 11:18 AM Rating: Decent
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In my other thread, i stated that i was gonna get a i5 and Radeon 5850
but i end up getting a i7 930 bloomfield and a GTX470 video card.

my friend told me i should OC my stuff because I'm getting these parts to get the most out of them, he said we never know how long the parts will last before it dies, but then I would like my computer to have a longer life then pushing it to the limit and die on me.

my only advise is, just take Mikhalia's advise on everything computer related, and you will be fine lol
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#12 Aug 07 2010 at 11:19 AM Rating: Decent
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Here check these video tutorials. It's not that hard if you want to do a small OC.Its when you start going to the higher level is when you got to worry about cpu voltage and keeping it cool. I'm no expert by no means but thats what I gathered from my personal OC experiences.

Video tutorials
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#13 Aug 07 2010 at 11:21 AM Rating: Good
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http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/phenom-overclock-athlon,2161.html

There's a good start on basic overclocking.

Quote:
I finally decided it's not worth the amount of time you need to put into it to do it right. In addition you'll be severely reducing the lifespan of your hardware and without a proper cooling unit, you could fry your processor or motherboard outright.


Granted, it takes a little time, but today's modern processors can put out great results. my shiny new AMD X6 is running stable @ 4.11Ghz [stock is 3.2] As for reducing the lifespan or frying your equipment, this is why you really kinda want to know what you're doing beforehand. All hardware has an acceptable voltage range, so pushing up the voltages past "stock" does not necessarily mean your machine will only live 6 months. Even if the lifespan of your equipment is reduced to 3 or 4 years, the odds are if you're even semi-serious about overclocking or your own system performance you'll have already upgraded anyway.

You're right about cooling, however. absolutely ESSENTIAL to have exceptional cooling if you're planning to overclock at all. This is why having an understanding of your hardware is essential.

Google "overclock my [insert CPU model here]" and read up on others' experiences. Get an idea of what's involved, what all the numbers mean, and how they relate to your machine. LEARN.

Sure, it does take time to do, and probably a lot more time to learn about. . but knowledge of any kind, ESPECIALLY computer knowledge, is always useful. Remember: Those who do not EMBRACE technology are doomed to be REPLACED by it :)


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#14 Aug 07 2010 at 3:44 PM Rating: Decent
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Inevitable7 wrote:
I finally got my new PC (pre-built). I wasn't going to take a chance on building a pc, spending $100-200 more and something goes wrong.

I tested the benchmark 3 times on low and high.

Score Low: 3600-4000

High: 2500-3000

Now for what I want, this is fine. But I have heard overclocking even a little can improve performance, but I have never done it, nor do I know how to.

Here's the link if you need more info
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883227274

Desktop pc

Athlon II x4 635 (2.9GHz)
4 GB Ram
Radeon HD 5770 1gb
500GB HD

What would I need to do to overclock even a little to improve performance? Steps I need to take etc?

I know overheating can be an issue, where can I check to see what mine is, running the system to it's capabilities etc and what temperature do I want to stay below?


Excellent advice here.

I just built my system Wednesday, a first time doing so. I then researched how to overclock, and have easily overclocked my AMD 965 BE & my eVGA 470. It wasn't hard, just take the time to read, ask a few questions, and soon it will make some sense. Enough to get it done, even if you just follow in others footsteps :)

Good luck.
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#15 Aug 08 2010 at 9:30 AM Rating: Decent
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Try OC'ing your GPU. If you have an ATI Radeon GPU and a pre-built system you should already have the "ATI Catalyst Control Center" installed. From there you can either manually OC or use the "auto-tune" feature. Manually OC'ing means you'll have to run your own load tests. I'd suggest using Furmark for that. If you opt for the auto-tune your GPU will stress test itself and decide upon an acceptable overclock.

If you need any additional help check out; http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/overclock-ati-video-card-ati-overdrive/
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#16 Aug 08 2010 at 11:14 AM Rating: Decent
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When you overclock, make sure you change the correct settings. Some of them can look very similar when you haven't gotten enough sleep. I overclocked what I thought was a one of the settings for my ram, and after three hundred dollars, i realized is wasn't. Just be careful.
#17 Aug 08 2010 at 11:36 AM Rating: Good
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It's not difficult to overclock once you figure out what does what... What's difficult and time consuming is keeping your computer stable in the process. I'd be willing to bet most, if not all, of you "first time overclockers" won't pass a stress test.

Here's a quick and dirty stress test: http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Benchmarks/IntelBurnTest.shtml

If your computer crashes after running that, then your computer isn't stable and I would recommend returning you settings to stock before you start playing any modern games.

Edited, Aug 8th 2010 10:36am by Ravida
#18 Aug 08 2010 at 7:40 PM Rating: Good
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The question isn't if it is easy or not it's, "Are you willing to read and learn a lot about this topic, and take time to do it right." Most times I'll suggest people OC because, 1. It's fun, and 2. I assume people can (if they have the desire to) do it. IT's not rocket science, but you can mess things up. IF you are somewhat technically inclined then it's a no-brainer. IF you aren't and just want a quick fix, then it's really not a smart thing to do.

There are little things to achieve a stable OC that may need to be disabled like Spread Spectrum or Virtualization, and at the very least you need to know what settings to tinker or even if they are able to be tinkered with.

IF you are willing to undertake this endeavor this is what an overclock may look like with someone with little experience. (Very generic flow chart)

1. Read as much as you can about OCing.
2. Find out if your MB can OC.
3. Read some more about your specific situation/parts: Google.
4. Understand that before you mess with settings, you're on your own.
4b. Download OC support programs. (CPU-Z, RivaTuner, RealTemp, etc.)
5. Mess with settings. (Change FSB, multiplier, voltage etc.)
6. You will have to be comfortable opening your case and resetting your CMOS.
6b. You may have to buy and install better cooling for your case, CPU and/or GPU.
7. Read some more.
8. Mess with more settings.
9. Once your computer boots into Windows you need to stress test.
10. Stress test. (Prime95, SuperPi, IntelBurn Test)
11. If Stress test fails, change/lower OC settings.
12. Once stress test passes then you're good to go.
13. Run FFXIV benchmark and see how much gain you get. The benchmark responds pretty well to OCing and you should gain anywhere from 20-40%. I personally gained about 30% through OCing and various Windows tweaks.
14. Some people recommend running a bit lower OC than your highest stable OC for daily use.
#19 Aug 08 2010 at 8:12 PM Rating: Good
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Quote:
6b. You may have to buy and install better cooling for your case, CPU and/or GPU.


and in the course of reading, you will find that "you may have to buy and in stall better cooling" means "Don't go any further until you've completed this step ;)

just trust me on this one ;)

Edited, Aug 8th 2010 10:16pm by seneleron
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#20 Aug 08 2010 at 8:35 PM Rating: Decent
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Hmmmm, this gives me hope. Only 729 for a computer that will run FF14. I like it.
#21 Aug 08 2010 at 9:23 PM Rating: Good
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Before you overclock, think about if you can afford to replace one part and/or every part in your computer. Next research cooling, because without that, you might burn out before you figure out. Run benchmarks before you overclock. Then run them again after you overclock. Like someone else said, do your research on your hardware and overclocking results made by other people. Did it crash? Did your performance increase?

Finally, if you are overclocking before the games(s) that you are trying to run have not been released yet, and also have not had time to diagnose different systems, then you are wasting your time with overclocking.
#22 Aug 09 2010 at 8:05 AM Rating: Decent
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Thanks for all the responses.

I may or may not actually do it of course, depending on what I read.

I mean at 3600-4000 on low, and 2600-3000 on high, this is all I really cared for to begin with. And I'm not sure how much 200-300 points would help. I don't need the most amazing settings out there, but I was curious as to how hard it would be to OC since I have been reading a lot of posts about it.
#23 Aug 09 2010 at 8:53 AM Rating: Good
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Oh, I dunno. . 2.9 to 3.7 [though as the tester states, that voltage is a little more nuts than I'd care to run personally]

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1199/11/

I would think that a decent overclock would get you a little more than "200-300 points"
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#24 Aug 09 2010 at 10:03 AM Rating: Good
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Wow Shinta! You have more artifacts than Egypt!
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#25 Aug 16 2010 at 4:36 PM Rating: Good
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I tried overclocking my CPU a little with Turbo V. An application that lets you tweak the settings without actually playing with the bios.

Anyway, I tweaked it just a bit. i7 930 2.8GHz. I tweaked it up to 3.2GHz.

I ran the FFXIV benchmark and it gave me an extra 300 pointson low, but one thing is the ambient sound cuts out about 20 secs to the end of each scene. I can still hear the voices but the background sounds stop near the end?

Is this normal? Or would this affect normal gameplay? Is there a way to overcome this?
#26 Aug 17 2010 at 12:20 AM Rating: Good
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if youre interested in overclocking your cpu, theres really no problem in going for about a 50mhz bump, just to see how overclocking works. from there you can try going higher either through the multiplier (if its unlocked) or the fsb.

looking at your cpu, you can start off at a 50mhz OC by upping the fsb by only 4mhz.

2900mhz core / 200mhz fsb = 14.5 multiplier

2950mhz core / 14.5 = 203.45mhz fsb

So, I tried to oc my 3.4ghz Phenom II BE, and made it to 3.8ghz by upping the multiplier, and nothing else. It had no effect on increasing my 'high' benchmark score, but increased my 'low' score by about 100 points. it seems to me like OC'ing the GPU would have more of an effect on the high score.
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#27 Aug 17 2010 at 10:10 PM Rating: Decent
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I am not 100% certain of the accuracy of my post below as I am not a computer technician, it is just what I think based on my personal experience.

The question of whether OC'ing is worth it depends on where the bottle necks are on your system.

If I am running a graphically intensive game that has full support for cross fire, but processor support is limited to 2 cores, then I will bottleneck at my processor. Hence, a good stable overclock on my processor will bring it up to power with what I get out of my graphics cards and increase performance overall.

I have water cooling on my processor to get some decent leeway in oc'ing whilst maintaining stable temps.

If a game has full support for all 6 cores on my processor, I may well bottleneck my GPU's (though this hasnt really happened before), in which case OC'ing my processor would be a pointless exercise with no (or little) benefit.
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#28 Aug 17 2010 at 10:35 PM Rating: Excellent
A few days ago OC'd my Phenom 955 from 3.2 to 3.5, not a huge OC but I did it mainly to try it. I got it up to a stable 3.6 but my temps got higher than I was comfortable with. I have an ok (ie not for OC but much better than stock) aftermarket cooler but if you are going to go for broke spend the money and get something rugged. The best advice I can give you being a first timer as well is read, read, read, prepare for some frustration and cooling, cooling, cooling. I may give it another go after I upgrade my cooler. That little bump did get me to 4350 on the bench, an improvement of 170. Not huge but still nice to see :)
#29 Aug 17 2010 at 11:31 PM Rating: Decent
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Is it worth overclocking your ATI 5770? I'm curious because i can use catalyst for that and i'm a noob for OC'ing so i was wondering if the performance enhancement is worth it? anyone try it?
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#30 Aug 17 2010 at 11:34 PM Rating: Default
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depends if what your CPU is at. if your like at 2.6-2.9.. probably not. bottlenecked
#31 Aug 17 2010 at 11:38 PM Rating: Decent
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Does it depend on how many cores too? my CPU is Phenom 6 xore 2.8 GHz, don't bother OCing GPU?
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#32 Aug 17 2010 at 11:40 PM Rating: Default
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well with a 5770 you prob wouldnt be bottlenecked, you can try it out, usually most cards minus the 400 series that can give 15+fps performance. Most cases you see like 2-3fps improvement and not in all games.

you could try and test it. Would'nt hurt.
#33 Aug 18 2010 at 12:01 AM Rating: Decent
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Ok i'm giving this a shot right now. Now, I've been adjusting GPU clock settings and memory clock settings in increments of 10MHz each - running custom clocks test - and passing each time (so far) - I notice that my GPU temperature is increasing a little here (it went from 44 {stock} to 47 at the moment) but the fan speed isn't increasing, is this something normal? I would assume that the fan speed would increase automatically as the card gets hotter...should I keep going? is it safe so far? I've only increased both GPU and Memory by about 50 MHz so far.
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#34 Aug 18 2010 at 7:43 AM Rating: Decent
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SolidMack wrote:
Ok i'm giving this a shot right now. Now, I've been adjusting GPU clock settings and memory clock settings in increments of 10MHz each - running custom clocks test - and passing each time (so far) - I notice that my GPU temperature is increasing a little here (it went from 44 {stock} to 47 at the moment) but the fan speed isn't increasing, is this something normal? I would assume that the fan speed would increase automatically as the card gets hotter...should I keep going? is it safe so far? I've only increased both GPU and Memory by about 50 MHz so far.


Download MSI Afterburner and use it. It lets you manually set the fan speed however you want. You can set it to automatically scale with temperature.
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#35 Aug 18 2010 at 3:24 PM Rating: Decent
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I said this exact same thing in another thread. This is more for someone looking to buy a new graphics card and is worried about OC'ing it and breaking it:

All EVGA video cards come with a lifetime warranty even if you OC them. They actually encourage OC. So I am OC'ing my GTX470 and not worrying if it decreases the lifespan because I can always get a new one free. My core clock stock is 600mhz. I have it OC;d to 800mhz, which is about what the GTX480 runs at.

Something to keep in mind if anyone is in the market for a new card get EVGA and overclock at will.
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#36 Aug 18 2010 at 6:09 PM Rating: Decent
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Yeah I myself and still confused concerning the benchmark scoring. My very decent but 1yr old gaming rig got a score of 1300 on high, yet the benchmark never lagged or skipped a beat once. It was clear, crisp and didnt appear to drop framerates. I'm wondering if theres actually something wrong with the benchmark.
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