Forum Settings
       
This Forum is Read Only

XIV killing my cpu?Follow

#1 Sep 23 2010 at 11:39 PM Rating: Decent
Since installing and having a brief go on the retail version of 14 I have noticed that my CPU fan seems to be on max even after turning the pc off and leaving it over night. So I downloaded coretemp and it says as I sit here with just the browser open that my core temp for both core is 75c. I just recently ordered a new cpu that i'm waiting to arrive in the post but I think i'd like to work out the cause of this before fitting the new one. I did a bit of googling but most of what I turned up was things going wrong after people had been playing with there bios anyone fancy helping me out because everything was fine in beta this has only happened since playing the retail version.
____________________________
75 WHM/BLM/PUP/BRD/MNK
Clothcraft 86 Cooking 60 Rank 10
http://www.themuteki.com
#2 Sep 23 2010 at 11:44 PM Rating: Decent
Edited by bsphil
******
21,739 posts
It sounds like the thermal paste is screwed up. When you get the new CPU, go buy a syringe of Arctic Silver 5 and make the paste job as thin and smooth on the CPU case as possible. Use a business card or a piece of strong, flexible plastic to spread it thin and even.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 12:45am by bsphil
____________________________
His Excellency Aethien wrote:
Almalieque wrote:
If no one debated with me, then I wouldn't post here anymore.
Take the hint guys, please take the hint.
gbaji wrote:
I'm not getting my news from anywhere Joph.
#3 Sep 23 2010 at 11:52 PM Rating: Decent
Cool I ordered that the same time as I ordered the new cpu, odd that it decided to do this the day after I ordered a new one must be angry at me for replacing it. Thanks for putting my mind at easy.



Edited, Sep 24th 2010 1:52am by Ommadon
____________________________
75 WHM/BLM/PUP/BRD/MNK
Clothcraft 86 Cooking 60 Rank 10
http://www.themuteki.com
#4 Sep 24 2010 at 12:32 AM Rating: Good
**
412 posts
I think a better method is to place a small amount (about the size of a grain of rice) smack in the middle and then let the heatsink spread it. This way you can avoid air pockets which turn in to Hot pockets =(
____________________________
They appeared from the sky, the one without a heart... "Omega"...And the one who followed it..."Shinryuu"...
Final Fantasy 5
#5 Sep 24 2010 at 12:35 AM Rating: Decent
Edited by bsphil
******
21,739 posts
lambon wrote:
I think a better method is to place a small amount (about the size of a grain of rice) smack in the middle and then let the heatsink spread it. This way you can avoid air pockets which turn in to Hot pockets =(
That tends to lead to an improper spread of thermal paste. If you want to do it the best way possible, spread it thin and even manually. If you do a good job spreading the paste you won't have to worry about air pockets anyway.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 1:36am by bsphil
____________________________
His Excellency Aethien wrote:
Almalieque wrote:
If no one debated with me, then I wouldn't post here anymore.
Take the hint guys, please take the hint.
gbaji wrote:
I'm not getting my news from anywhere Joph.
#6 Sep 24 2010 at 12:37 AM Rating: Good
bsphil wrote:
lambon wrote:
I think a better method is to place a small amount (about the size of a grain of rice) smack in the middle and then let the heatsink spread it. This way you can avoid air pockets which turn in to Hot pockets =(
That tends to lead to an improper spread of thermal paste. If you want to do it the best way possible, spread it thin and even manually. If you do a good job spreading the paste you won't have to worry about air pockets anyway.


Nobody recommends that anymore. You don't need 100% coverage on the chip. The grain-of-rice-sized blob in the middle + squish is perfectly adequate, typically faster, and not nearly so messy as spreading it around.
#7 Sep 24 2010 at 12:40 AM Rating: Decent
Edited by bsphil
******
21,739 posts
Whatever, do it however you feel like.
____________________________
His Excellency Aethien wrote:
Almalieque wrote:
If no one debated with me, then I wouldn't post here anymore.
Take the hint guys, please take the hint.
gbaji wrote:
I'm not getting my news from anywhere Joph.
#8 Sep 24 2010 at 12:54 AM Rating: Default
**
761 posts
It fried my video card 2 hours into retail eventhough beta ran fine.
____________________________
FFXI: Gonz on Titan

FFXIV: Ninja Wind on Besaid

WoW: Ninjawind on Andorhal-US

[ffxisig]137247[/ffxisig]


#9 Sep 24 2010 at 1:18 AM Rating: Default
**
696 posts
The One and Only Aurelius wrote:
bsphil wrote:
lambon wrote:
I think a better method is to place a small amount (about the size of a grain of rice) smack in the middle and then let the heatsink spread it. This way you can avoid air pockets which turn in to Hot pockets =(
That tends to lead to an improper spread of thermal paste. If you want to do it the best way possible, spread it thin and even manually. If you do a good job spreading the paste you won't have to worry about air pockets anyway.


Nobody recommends that anymore. You don't need 100% coverage on the chip. The grain-of-rice-sized blob in the middle + squish is perfectly adequate, typically faster, and not nearly so messy as spreading it around.


That just sounds like a terrible idea. letting the outside 20% of your processor potentially go without paste... no thanks. Spreading it and being very careful with seating is the only good way. Noone who wants to do repair work on a computer may recommend that but the rest of us do.
#10 Sep 24 2010 at 1:26 AM Rating: Good
Scholar
*
135 posts
I used to do the spreading thin and all as well. Tried the dab in the middle, and... it works. If you put too little, sure it won't reach everywhere. But use the right amount and it hits 90% of the surface and you avoid air pockets like Aurelius stated. In fact there's guides about it out there. Here's one for example.
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=38


Edited, Sep 24th 2010 3:26am by ispanolfw
#11 Sep 24 2010 at 1:38 AM Rating: Decent
**
696 posts
ispanolfw wrote:
I used to do the spreading thin and all as well. Tried the dab in the middle, and... it works. If you put too little, sure it won't reach everywhere. But use the right amount and it hits 90% of the surface and you avoid air pockets like Aurelius stated. In fact there's guides about it out there. Here's one for example.
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=38


Edited, Sep 24th 2010 3:26am by ispanolfw

That test just showed me that on a square processor using a small dab is quite possibly the worst thing you could do. Your post acts like it says it worked fine. That was not the case. on a circular fixture it was ok.... on a SQUARE(which is what most of us have) It failed miserably in most cases not even getting 70% of it. Thanks for proving my point for me lol
#12 Sep 24 2010 at 1:40 AM Rating: Decent
Edited by bsphil
******
21,739 posts
ispanolfw wrote:
I used to do the spreading thin and all as well. Tried the dab in the middle, and... it works. If you put too little, sure it won't reach everywhere. But use the right amount and it hits 90% of the surface and you avoid air pockets like Aurelius stated. In fact there's guides about it out there. Here's one for example.
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=38
The Author wrote:
Last but not least is my own personal method. Not to harp on the subject, but you don't want a thick layer of thermal compound between mounting surfaces. There isn't a magic thickness to suggest, since different surface finishes will require different amounts of material to fill them. If both surfaces were as smooth as glass though, I would need less than half the material used in the above tests to reach the same coverage.

So when I come across a very rough yet level surface, I prefer to smooth out the material using a rubber finger cover or plastic bag in directions opposite to the grain. This does an excellent job of filling in the groves and scratches, and can be used in combination to the above methods as a base. In cases where I use both methods, the "base" coat is extremely thin and the metal beneath it is still visible.

However if I choose to use just the one layer, I leave a coat just barely thick enough to hide the metal surface below it. This method doesn't leave enough material to spread out across the surface and press out bubbles as it bleeds, so the cooler must not be placed flatly onto the processor surface to begin with. Instead this method must be carefully placed down at a slight angle as it is compressed, similar to how you might apply an adhesive sticker to avoid bubbles.
Just saying, it's the method he uses for his own computers.

Though I'm not really sure why people prefer to put the material on the heatsink rather than the CPU cover. The CPU is going to almost universally be smaller.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 2:41am by bsphil
____________________________
His Excellency Aethien wrote:
Almalieque wrote:
If no one debated with me, then I wouldn't post here anymore.
Take the hint guys, please take the hint.
gbaji wrote:
I'm not getting my news from anywhere Joph.
#13 Sep 24 2010 at 4:14 AM Rating: Decent
Scholar
*
135 posts
zoltanrs wrote:
ispanolfw wrote:
I used to do the spreading thin and all as well. Tried the dab in the middle, and... it works. If you put too little, sure it won't reach everywhere. But use the right amount and it hits 90% of the surface and you avoid air pockets like Aurelius stated. In fact there's guides about it out there. Here's one for example.
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=170&Itemid=38


Edited, Sep 24th 2010 3:26am by ispanolfw

That test just showed me that on a square processor using a small dab is quite possibly the worst thing you could do. Your post acts like it says it worked fine. That was not the case. on a circular fixture it was ok.... on a SQUARE(which is what most of us have) It failed miserably in most cases not even getting 70% of it. Thanks for proving my point for me lol


Would you I rather have found something ONLY promoting one method? With no testing at all? I wonder how you would have responded to that? I've tested it personally, applying a small amount to the HS and letting it do the spreading vs me doing it. I lost a few degrees. Will that work for everyone? No, of course not, BUT guess what? It's not bad advice, for one main reason. You know the heat spreaders on CPUs these days? Typically larger than the core they are in contact with, which is usually in the center. Now these heat spreaders don't really do much to "spread" the heat to the outer edges, hence the small circle on stock Intel heatsinks. They do however, do a great job of keeping the core from getting damaged.
In any case, any of these methods is far superior to the stock slab of goop that come on stock heatsinks.
#14 Sep 24 2010 at 4:15 AM Rating: Decent
Scholar
*
135 posts
bsphil wrote:
Just saying, it's the method he uses for his own computers.

Though I'm not really sure why people prefer to put the material on the heatsink rather than the CPU cover. The CPU is going to almost universally be smaller.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 2:41am by bsphil


I would do it either way, but I could see maybe because the heatsink is outside the case aka more accessible as being a reason.
#15 Sep 24 2010 at 5:53 AM Rating: Good
*
155 posts
*wave*
I spread a very thin layer on the CPU then also put a small blob in the middle. This should cover both issues to some degree - just make sure you don't put too much on.

It also helps to have a DECENT 3rd party cooler (mine screws on to a mounting bracket which squishes onto theCPU quite snuugly), but it doesn't even have to be expensive. Using the Artic Cooling Freezer Pro V2 myself for £16 with Arctic Silver £4.

Idle temp is 40C with fan on about 40% (i5 750). Goes up to about 50C when clocked to 3.5GHz fan on about 60%.

I'm more concerned about my GPU temps atm.

Oh... and I have only ever seen idle temps of 65-70C+ on badly fitted coolers.
____________________________
In this life you are nothing without someone else to think so.

#16 Sep 24 2010 at 6:13 AM Rating: Good
Sage
*
60 posts
Personally, I use the cross method.. The dot method is outdated, intended for older cpus. The strip method is okay, but better implemented in 2 parallel strips, it will typically yield the best "square shape" and it yields very similar results to the cross method. The pre-spread method can and will result in air pockets, which isn't ideal.

The best way to test this is to test it yourself.. I have. Or just watch this. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyXLu1Ms-q4&feature=related
#17 Sep 24 2010 at 9:05 AM Rating: Decent
**
291 posts
Why don't people just read the instructions. Any quality thermal paste provider posts a best practice based on paste type and CPU type. See Artic Silver website for what I mean.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 11:07am by NayliaMR
____________________________

#18 Sep 24 2010 at 9:35 AM Rating: Decent
Avatar
46 posts
bsphil wrote:
It sounds like the thermal paste is screwed up. When you get the new CPU, go buy a syringe of Arctic Silver 5 and make the paste job as thin and smooth on the CPU case as possible. Use a business card or a piece of strong, flexible plastic to spread it thin and even.
Edited, Sep 24th 2010 12:45am by bsphil


Dont apply the paste like this.

Just make a thin line in the center of the CPU, about 1cm long (and 1 mm thick). Then you press the heatsink to the cooler, the paste will spread to where it needs to go. Also note that too much paste is as bad as not enough.

Edited, Sep 24th 2010 11:38am by MinosGraedus
____________________________


This forum is read only
This Forum is Read Only!
Recent Visitors: 18 All times are in CST
Anonymous Guests (18)