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How hard is it to install a PSUFollow

#1 Sep 26 2010 at 12:13 PM Rating: Decent
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I'm sort of a beginner and need to know if I should have Best Buy install my power supply unit for $50 or I can do it myself? Thanks guys.
#2 Sep 26 2010 at 12:16 PM Rating: Decent
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If you've never done it before just have someone do it for you. Depending on your system there are alot of connections that need to be made. You don't want to mess it up.
#3 Sep 26 2010 at 12:17 PM Rating: Good
It's pretty straight forward, generally there's 4 screws holding it up at the back. Take em out, pop it out, if you're worried about where all the connections go, then keep them plugged in, and switch em out one at a time with the same connection on the new PSU. Or just look up some info on the net, these connections can usually only go one place any how.
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#4 Sep 26 2010 at 12:17 PM Rating: Decent
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spiniCA wrote:
I'm sort of a beginner and need to know if I should have Best Buy install my power supply unit for $50 or I can do it myself? Thanks guys.


My theory on this is.. if you have to ask, then it's better to have someone do it for you, or at least show you how to do it.

It really depends on your current setup. If the PSU is right above the the motherboard, then it's possible that you would have to take that out before even being able to remove the PSU. And if you really aren't sure where all the plugs go... well then you could end up damaging something else.
#5 Sep 26 2010 at 12:19 PM Rating: Default
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0ok so it sounds for $50 its worth having Best Buy do it, thanks guys.
#6 Sep 26 2010 at 12:27 PM Rating: Good
Honestly, the first time I did it, never done it before, didn't ask anyone, it as straightforward. 50$ is ridiculous for someone to install that, you could invest that money in a better PSU or another PC part... or anything else for that matter. Just check out a few guides on line, like I said, there really isn't many connections you can mess up, if any with newer pc's.
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#7 Sep 26 2010 at 12:31 PM Rating: Default
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Cool I'll check out some guides, thanks.
#8 Sep 26 2010 at 1:22 PM Rating: Decent
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It's easy, but as far as PC part swapping I would say it's the third most difficult. First being the case, because you have to change everything out, second being the motherboard. Easiest is definitely RAM.
#9 Sep 26 2010 at 1:43 PM Rating: Decent
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I'd recommend doing it yourself, or at the very least having somebody you know show you how to do it yourself. This'll save you money, and if you ever want to build a pc you're one step closer to being able to do it yourself. Honestly, after the PSU everything else pretty much falls into place.
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#10 Sep 26 2010 at 1:46 PM Rating: Good
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You need atleast rank 10 blacksmith before attempting.
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#11 Sep 26 2010 at 1:47 PM Rating: Excellent
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I have a guide in my journal on building your own computer. Part of that includes a power supply. They're actually very easy to install.

Shut it off.
Unplug all the connections from the existing one.
Unscrew the old one.
***** in the new one.
Plug it into motherboard (20+4 pin and 4+4 pin, two places)
Plug it into any HDs and Optical Drives, and GPU and anything else like fans that requires power.
Turn it on.
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#12 Sep 26 2010 at 1:51 PM Rating: Decent
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SolidMack wrote:
You need atleast rank 10 blacksmith before attempting.


+1

Heed this warning.
#13 Sep 26 2010 at 3:43 PM Rating: Default
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Lol thanks guys, I think I'm gonna try it.
#14 Sep 26 2010 at 3:52 PM Rating: Decent
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BRizzl3 wrote:
It's easy, but as far as PC part swapping I would say it's the third most difficult. First being the case, because you have to change everything out, second being the motherboard. Easiest is definitely RAM.


My aftermarket cooler was the toughest, but that's just because I was scared I'd damage my cpu;)
#15 Sep 26 2010 at 5:59 PM Rating: Decent
Edited by bsphil
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spiniCA wrote:
0ok so it sounds for $50 its worth having Best Buy do it, thanks guys.
God no. What a waste of money. I wouldn't pay someone $5 to do it.
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#16 Sep 26 2010 at 6:52 PM Rating: Decent
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I did mine for the first time in preparation for FF XIV, and I was a bit nervous being it my first time with no help.

Honestly it wasn't that bad. Taking out cables and plugging in cables related to the MB was the easiest part.

The only part I had a hard time with was removing/cables to the HD because my case has a stupid setup, and I guess I can blame Gateway. On a brighter note, between doing this, changing HDs, adding fans, cable management, removing unused hardware, and changing GPX card, I now have the confidence to also change out my MB/Processor when the new lineup comes out next year. So I gained some basic computer upgrading skills/understanding , and hopefully I never have to deal with pre-built PCs again.

One big piece of advice I'd really recommend though if it's an available option to you, and that would be to practice on an old PC. It'll familiarize you the general process, and more importantly build your confidence/knowledge.

That being said, you do run the off chance of making a mistake, good luck.
#17 Sep 26 2010 at 6:54 PM Rating: Good
For 50 bucks?! What a rip off. It's not hard, just make sure you know where everything is plugged beforehand and do it the same way. Oh, and unplug it first. :P


Oh and plug it in again when you're done. ;)
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#18 Sep 26 2010 at 6:56 PM Rating: Default
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That was a great idea. I do have an old pc I can practice with, thanks.
#19 Sep 26 2010 at 7:04 PM Rating: Good
Protip: Plug it into the electrical socket last.
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#20 Sep 26 2010 at 7:11 PM Rating: Good
One time I was switching some things in my computer, I had done a few things, unplugging it and making a change (I think I was testing some cords because it was having some intermittent problems) and I got cocky and stopped unplugging it, just turned it off. Well, I pulled the power cord from the hard drive, and somehow accidentally hit it against the IDE slot on the hard drive and there was a big spark. No more hard drive. :(
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#21 Sep 26 2010 at 7:14 PM Rating: Default
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That sucks.
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