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#1 Jan 25 2011 at 5:27 PM Rating: Good
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Can i even play ffxiv with my specs?

Im assuming no, but before i drop a grand or two in building my own computer i want to know if its even possible.

I also have an Nvidia Geforce 7300 gt which is pretty darn outdated lol

so here it is...

im awaiting a lot of no's and i know how this website is so im awaiting the abuse lol but its all good. i know its a no. but doesnt hurt to see other peoples experiences.






» Desktop PC buying guide
» Learn more about the HP TouchSmart PC
» Technical Support







Processor, Operating System and Memory
Operating system installed
Genuine Windows Vista Home Premium

Processor
Intel ® Viiv™ Processor Technology with an Intel ® Core™2 Duo Processor E4400
• 2.00GHz, 2MB L2 Cache, 800MHz Front Side Bus

Chipset
Intel ® 945G Express Chipset

Standard memory
2048MB PC2-5300 DDR2 SDRAM memory (2x1024MB for ultimate performance) (expandable to 4GB)

Memory type
DDR2-SDRAM

Memory slots
4 DIMM (240-pin, DDR2) (two available)

Internal drives
Internal hard disk drive
320GB

Hard disk controller
Serial ATA hard drive

Hard disk drive speed
(7200 rpm)

Optical drive type
SuperMulti DVD Burner with LightScribe Technology

Optical drive speed
16x DVD±R, 8x DVD+RW, 6x DVD-RW, 8x DVD+R DL, 8x DVD-R DL, 12x DVD-RAM, 16x DVD-ROM, 40x CDR, 32x CDRW, 40x CD-ROM ROM

System features
Memory card device
15in1 memory card reader

Modem
56k modem

Network interface
Ethernet 10/100/1000BT integrated network interface

Video adapter
Intel ® Graphics Media Accelerator 950 with 64MB dedicated graphics memory. Up to 256MB Total Available Graphics Memory as allocated by Windows Vista®

Video RAM
64MB

Internal audio
High Definition Audio, 8 speaker configurable

Keyboard
HP multimedia keyboard

External drive bays
2 external 5.25"(one available), 1 external 3.5" (occupied)

External I/O ports
6 USB 2.0 port(s), 2 FireWire (IEEE 1394) port(s), Microphone/Headphone/Line-in, 2 PS/2; Digital Audio (In & Out); LAN; Rear speaker out/Side speaker out/Center out/Center (subwoofer); Microphone/Line-in/Line-out; VGA - Out

Expansion slots
2 PCI slots (1 available), 1 PCI-E x1 slot (available), 1 PCI-E x16 slot (available)

Software
Included/Pre-installed software
Microsoft® Internet Explorer 7.0; Windows Mail; Adobe® Reader 8.0

Software - internet & online
Internet Solutions (Up to 3 months service included) • * Bell Sympatico High Speed Internet * EastLink High Speed Internet Access * Netscape High Speed Internet Service * Netscape Accelerated Internet Service * Shaw High-Speed Internet Access

Software included
Recovery partition (including possibility to recover system, applications and drivers separately); Optional re-allocation of recovery partition; Recovery CD/DVD creation tool; Symantec™ Norton Internet Security™ 2007 (60 days live update)

Dimensions / weight / warranty
Weight
9.60 kg

Package weight
14 kg

Dimensions (w x d x h)
175 x 414 x 387 mm

Package dimensions (W x D x H)
245 x 599 x 498 mm

Warranty Statement
Service Options: - Hardware: One year parts and labor from date of purchase - Software: 90 day technical toll-free phone assistance - Service Delivery: Customer Replaceable Parts; Return to hp for repair; Authorized Service Provider. For information, visit www.hp.ca/support




Edited, Jan 25th 2011 6:29pm by Tridant
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#2 Jan 25 2011 at 5:47 PM Rating: Decent
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thats a little to much info, but i'm going to have to say no.

and if it could run it, you definatley wouldn't have a good experience, even on lowest settings.

if you have the 2000$ to spend here is a good setup that i personally use:

antec twelve hundred case (~150$)
antec cp-1000 PSU (~150$)
dx58so motherboard (~250$)
intel i7-950 quad core processor (~300$)
HD-6970 in crossfire (2 graphics cards) (~800$)
2 sticks of 4gb DDR3 1600 mhz RAM (~150$)
windows 7 64-bit (~200$)

the hard drive doesnt matter as long as its not lower than 7200 rpm. 10000 rpm is preferable.

it's important that windows is 64-bit otherwise you wont be using the 8gb of ram installed.

with this setup you have the ability to overclock the processor and graphics cards quite a bit, just either be sure you know what your doing, or bring it to someone who does. cooling will also be a non-issue as the case has 6 fans blowing air right through the case.

Edited, Jan 25th 2011 7:04pm by Keysofgaruda
#3 Jan 25 2011 at 5:52 PM Rating: Excellent
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58 posts
If it was a Desktop PC and not a Laptop I would say you have potential, The real issue is the Video Card.. Intel onboard graphics are pretty much the worst I have ever encountered. So yeah, its a NO.. sorry


Edited, Jan 25th 2011 6:53pm by Sabmoog
#4 Jan 25 2011 at 5:56 PM Rating: Good
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My bad I guess It is a Desktop.. didnt read the whole spec sheet.
so yeah mostly its the Video Card, Upgrading to a 200 Series nVidia card would be minimum IMO, or a 5000 Series of ATI
Although I have to admit as a PC technician of 12 years, I always have better luck and performance from nVidia chipset cards.
#5 Jan 25 2011 at 6:09 PM Rating: Excellent
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CPU is low end but MIGHT be able to manage with a better card; no promises. Integrated graphics are terribad for anything beyond basic internet/school/business usage though, and you'd definitely want a better GPU.

No abuse though. Asking a question when you're not sure is one thing and people are generally pretty helpful around here. Being given an answer to a question and then trying to tell someone why/how they're wrong when you didn't know the answer in the first place, however, would earn you some abuse. :P

If you're looking to upgrade, my suggestions would be to consider replacing the Motherboard/CPU/RAM, Power Supply, and video card. You might be able to make due with just a new video card and power supply (most good video cards will require 550-650 watts or higher, and given that you're using an off the shelf system, I'd wager you probably have something between 250W-350W. Maybe a 425-450 at most, and I'm doubtful at that.

The -last- thing I'd advise, unless you have a lot of money to throw away, is buying a brand new system off the shelf. You'll usually not get your money's worth compared to just upgrading what you have or even building one from scratch if you desired.

If you decide you'd like to upgrade, I'd be happy to suggest some options to you.
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#6 Jan 25 2011 at 6:11 PM Rating: Excellent
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Sabmoog wrote:
My bad I guess It is a Desktop.. didnt read the whole spec sheet.
so yeah mostly its the Video Card, Upgrading to a 200 Series nVidia card would be minimum IMO, or a 5000 Series of ATI
Although I have to admit as a PC technician of 12 years, I always have better luck and performance from nVidia chipset cards.


Correction: GTX series nVidia or Radeon 57XX/68XX or higher. The 56XX and lower are terrible, and the 200/400 series GTS and GT cards are not really worth it.

My personal recommendations are typically a GTX 460 or a Radeon 5770.
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#7 Jan 25 2011 at 6:19 PM Rating: Decent
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Yes or No Answer
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#8 Jan 25 2011 at 6:20 PM Rating: Decent
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why not just wait for the PS3 release and get a finished version of the game, and spend a couple hundred gettin a PS3 if you dont have one already??

thats what im doin!
#9 Jan 25 2011 at 7:42 PM Rating: Decent
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221 posts
Thanks for the help guys appreciate it

I plan on getting an intel I7 950. Video cards, i havent done much research on. When i got this one it was top of the line, i was 99% sure my specs werent good enough for pleasant gameplay but wth i tried lol.

I wasnt sure what to post exactly so i copied and pasted my specs didnt want to leave anything out, better to be safe then annoyed lol.

I was looking at i believe it was the Geforce GTX 460? it was 299 in best buy. i feel i can do better than that but wth do i know. im new to all this b.s all over again just for some FFXIV... lol

Any recommendations for the best video card for ~300? and if possible a motherboard recommendation that would be compatible with the video card/processor combo?

Everything past those 3 choices i am not worried about. im just stuck on the infinite amount of choices there are as well as the new intel processors planned on coming out this year that makes me scared to get the 950 and then something way better comes out >_<
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"There are 3 types of people in the world, those that can count and those that can't."
#10 Jan 25 2011 at 7:56 PM Rating: Good
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Tridant wrote:
Thanks for the help guys appreciate it

I plan on getting an intel I7 950. Video cards, i havent done much research on. When i got this one it was top of the line, i was 99% sure my specs werent good enough for pleasant gameplay but wth i tried lol.

I wasnt sure what to post exactly so i copied and pasted my specs didnt want to leave anything out, better to be safe then annoyed lol.

I was looking at i believe it was the Geforce GTX 460? it was 299 in best buy. i feel i can do better than that but wth do i know. im new to all this b.s all over again just for some FFXIV... lol

Any recommendations for the best video card for ~300? and if possible a motherboard recommendation that would be compatible with the video card/processor combo?

Everything past those 3 choices i am not worried about. im just stuck on the infinite amount of choices there are as well as the new intel processors planned on coming out this year that makes me scared to get the 950 and then something way better comes out >_<


First recommendation: Don't buy a video card from a retail store. They charge insane markups. I suggest newegg.com for your computer hardware needs. If you're shopping in the $300 range, I suggest the GTX 470 or the Radeon 5870, either of which will set you back $250-300ish.

Intel/Radeon or AMD/nVidia are less popular combinations than Intel/nVidia or AMD/Radeon, but you should be fine either way. Just about any motherboard is compatible with just about any video card nowadays. The main point of compatibility is not motherboard/GPU but rather motehrboard/CPU. If you're getting an i7 950 then you need a motherboard with an LGA 1366 socket. If you can afford the 970/980 then hexacore all the way, but don't drive yourself broke; the hexacores can be pricey, especially the 980x. The Phenom II X6 Hexacores are significantly less pricey, but in terms of performance, an i7 950 beats pretty much anything AMD can offer in pretty much all applications. You get what you pay for; Phenoms are affordable with great performance and i7s are expensive with top-notch performance.

EDIT: And I post this from a Phenom II X4 925 powered machine, before anyone wants to call me an Intel fanboy.

Edited, Jan 25th 2011 8:58pm by Mikhalia
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#11 Jan 26 2011 at 3:40 AM Rating: Decent
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if your thinking of i7 1366 look at sandy bridge instead which performs the same or better when overclocked but costs less.

a 2500K + P67 mobo and a 560Ti/570 + 4GB of DDR 1600mhz 1.5V will net you a very fast system. if your not overclocking you can drop the K model on the 2500
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#12 Jan 26 2011 at 5:44 AM Rating: Decent
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Any hardware older than 3 years will not run the game. Integrated graphics forget it, nothing made will run it. If you build your own you can goto this website for reviews, http://www.tomshardware.com/us/#redir and this website for benchmarks http://www.passmark.com/products/pt_adv3d.htm , if you don't goto your local computer parts store (all the best geeks work there) ask them about their gaming pcs.

Stay away from best buy, walmart, stables ect., the majority of salespeoples don't really know their products.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 6:44am by Spyrit178
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#13 Jan 26 2011 at 5:57 AM Rating: Decent
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Don't buy HP premade PCs. To put it plainly, they are garbage for gaming, and overpriced by about 400 dollars each to boot. Just get a custom-built one from a reputable techie.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 5:58am by Uryuu
#14 Jan 26 2011 at 7:55 AM Rating: Decent
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yes, use newegg.com, they are fantastic with prices, shipping, customer service..ect. i havent boughten anywhere else (retail stores prices are 99% of the time WAY too overpriced)

The big question i have is this, is this mainly for FFXIV or do you have other big plans for the rig? (like lots of other games you want to play, other big tasks like video editing..ect) If you are pretty much building this for FFXIV and everything else is a minor afterthought, then don't invest now. If anything wait until the PS3 time and decide from there. Right now the game is in shamble, but very likely being put back together. By the time its good to go and they have the PS3 version out, prices will be down (computer tech changes so **** quickly) So hold off if you can.

Otherwise there are plenty of good things on here that people mentioned, just make sure they all fit together and you Power supply can run it. A good starting point is to poke around neweggs "combo" deals, which save you money and they all work together. If your replacing almost everything, its not a bad place to start.
#15 Jan 26 2011 at 8:14 AM Rating: Excellent
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Uryuu wrote:
Don't buy HP premade PCs premade PCs from any box store or major computer manufacturer. To put it plainly, they are garbage for gaming, and overpriced by about 400 dollars each to boot. Just get a custom-built one from a reputable techie.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 5:58am by Uryuu


Fixed.

Buying the parts and building yourself (or having someone build it for you) is the best option.

Sites that offer true custom configuration options (e.g. ibuypower, cyberpower) are your next best option.

Retail systems from Walmart/Best Buy/Staples or Dell/HP/Gateway:

- Usually include a weak GPU or charge you way too much to upgrade to a good model.
- Nearly always contain a weak power supply with low wattage and low 24V rail amperage that can't properly support a good GPU anyway.
- Are typically overpriced by 15-35%.
- Try to sell you more RAM that you need at a low bus speed and/or a massive hard drive (because most consumers who "don't know computers" only care about hard drive space and RAM without knowing what they need)

If you absolutely, positively -had- to buy a prefab and money was no object, I would probably suggest Alienware, but they are insanely overpriced.

Further reading:

http://ffxiv.zam.com/forum.html?forum=152&mid=1281386519180139540&page=2&howmany=50#msg128141035791456151
http://ffxiv.zam.com/forum.html?forum=152&mid=1281386519180139540&page=2&howmany=50#msg1281422528207605274
http://ffxiv.zam.com/forum.html?forum=152&mid=1281386519180139540&page=2&howmany=50#msg1281427037247281505

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 9:23am by Mikhalia
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#16 Jan 26 2011 at 9:49 AM Rating: Decent
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Uryuu wrote:
Don't buy HP premade PCs. To put it plainly, they are garbage for gaming, and overpriced by about 400 dollars each to boot. Just get a custom-built one from a reputable techie.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 5:58am by Uryuu


I have an HP Pavilion Elite that I picked up on sale at our local Best Buy and it runs the game beautifully, with Adobe illustrator running in the background. I love this PC, and don't have the patience/mind for either putting my own together or surfing through other built pcs. Broad generalizations are silly.
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#17 Jan 26 2011 at 11:24 AM Rating: Good
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@ Mik

Yeah, that pretty much sums it up.
The HP elite uses one of the worst gaming graphics cards, a GeForce 315. Some models use the Radeon HD 5450 but cost roughly 200-300 dollars extra.
http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/video_lookup.php?cpu=GeForce+315

I paid 500 for mine custom made, and it has a radeon HD 5570 (granted, its not the best, but its a mile ahead of the 315 in benchmarking) under the hood, as well as a blu-ray drive, dvd-rw, a much better processor, speakers, and many other things that the inferior, overpriced HP "elite" has.

In short, just because you think the elite is good because you've never had a real gaming rig, does not mean it is even worth the 700+ you spent on it. Closer to the 500 I spent on mine, possibly even 400.

Unlike some consumers, I have done extensive research into the products I plan on buying and have bought to be sure I don't get ripped off.

Or..did you buy this one, which is roughly equal to my PC, but over 1 thousand more?
http://www.shopping.hp.com/webapp/shopping/computer_can_series.do?storeName=computer_store&category=desktops&a1=Brand&v1=HP+Pavilion+Elite&series_name=HPE590t_series&jumpid=in_R329_prodexp/hhoslp/psg/desktops/HP_Pavilion_Elite/HPE590t_series



Personally, I believe the funniest part about this is that corporate America, through very effective pricing and ads, has convinced people that it would cost a grand to make their own gaming rig, when it only costs about 500-700 unless you use the best of the best parts, in which case, unless you're building a god and not a computer, it will take around 1.5k, which is still less than the best PC you can buy from them, but around 10x as good.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 11:41am by Uryuu
#18 Jan 26 2011 at 12:01 PM Rating: Decent
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Mikhalia the Picky wrote:
If you're shopping in the $300 range, I suggest the GTX 470 or the Radeon 5870, either of which will set you back $250-300ish.

Or two GTX 460's in SLI to outperform either single card for the same price (or lower... probably around $260-280 for both).

olaurelindorenan wrote:
I have an HP Pavilion Elite that I picked up on sale at our local Best Buy and it runs the game beautifully, with Adobe illustrator running in the background. I love this PC, and don't have the patience/mind for either putting my own together or surfing through other built pcs. Broad generalizations are silly.

The question is how much you paid for that rig, what parts are in it, and how much a comparable custom rig costs in comparison. I'd wager the "on sale" price on it is still higher than a custom.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 1:05pm by SoumaKyou
#19 Jan 26 2011 at 12:02 PM Rating: Good
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My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.
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#20 Jan 26 2011 at 12:10 PM Rating: Good
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olaurelindorenan wrote:
My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.

The problem is that it's not a $200 difference. The average mid-level custom rig costs anywhere between $800-900, and would be the equivalent to a $2000-2500++ retail "gaming" machine from HP/Dell/Alienware. I dunno about you, but saving $1200-1600 is time well spent.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 1:11pm by SoumaKyou
#21 Jan 26 2011 at 12:13 PM Rating: Excellent
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olaurelindorenan wrote:
My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.



In your case I would say you made a good decision, You have a computer that you use for work... that also happens to play the game.
I dont think there is anything wrong with that.
I think people are being harsh on you because they have the patience and ability to order parts online and build it themselves. (which I do)
But I have been in the IT buisness for so long I know that most (average) people dont mind spending the money getting something that is already built and working (with way too much added software on name brand models) rather than save some money ordering parts, waiting for it to be built, installing OS, Drivers ... etc..



Edited, Jan 26th 2011 1:16pm by Sabmoog
#22 Jan 26 2011 at 12:17 PM Rating: Good
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Mikhalia the Picky wrote:


EDIT: And I post this from a Phenom II X4 925 powered machine, before anyone wants to call me an Intel fanboy.

Edited, Jan 25th 2011 8:58pm by Mikhalia


Yeah my rig is a phenom II X4 955 with radeon 5850 - and it runs the game well. I can't crank the graphics but I have no trouble playing. It is a really affordable combo with the performance needed to play the game on reasonable settings.
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When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.


#23 Jan 26 2011 at 12:19 PM Rating: Good
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SoumaKyou wrote:
olaurelindorenan wrote:
My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.

The problem is that it's not a $200 difference. The average mid-level custom rig costs anywhere between $800-900, and would be the equivalent to a $2000-2500++ retail "gaming" machine from HP/Dell/Alienware. I dunno about you, but saving $1200-1600 is time well spent.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 1:11pm by SoumaKyou


my Hp 'gaming rig' cost 900 dollars :

AMD Phenom II 1045 six-core processor
ATI Radeon HD 5570
8GB DDR3 and a terabyte hard drive
windows 7 home premium 64 bit

Do I know what all that means? No, not entirely. I just know it works great and I paid under a grand, which is what I wanted. I find there is some elitism here, I'm not stupid because I want an easy-to-buy computer that works well :/
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#24 Jan 26 2011 at 12:23 PM Rating: Excellent
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SoumaKyou wrote:
olaurelindorenan wrote:
My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.

The problem is that it's not a $200 difference. The average mid-level custom rig costs anywhere between $800-900, and would be the equivalent to a $2000-2500++ retail "gaming" machine from HP/Dell/Alienware. I dunno about you, but saving $1200-1600 is time well spent.



Yeah, I had never built a computer before... took me about 5 hours but since I get paid around $25/hr - that is a "cost" in terms of time of $125. Add in another two hours of solid research time -- for $175 total "cost" (imaginary cost since it didn't really cost me anything)

I saved at least $500 - and I looked for a long time to find a rig with my specs off the shelf - it just doesn't exist. Everything would either have the processor I wanted and a crappy video card - or an overpowered videocard with a crappy processor, or a 500 W power supply or w/e. The point was all the retail rigs looked like crappy builds made out of whatever the manufacturer could find the cheapest.

So in reality I probably saved 700 bucks... so even factoring in time cost - I made out like a bandit.

I also learned stuff - which is invaluable imo.
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lolgaxe wrote:
When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.


#25 Jan 26 2011 at 12:28 PM Rating: Good
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olaurelindorenan wrote:
SoumaKyou wrote:
olaurelindorenan wrote:
My elite has an ATI Radeon HD 5570. For me the difference is doing the research. I don't have a mind for computers, I'm an artist and work quite a bit. If something that works is presented, and I can afford it, I'll pay the little extra to have what I want easily. Is it lazy? Yeah, but some people find time = money. The time I would spend trying to decipher what I'm looking at and getting frustrated at all the numbers I don't understand is not worth the 200 dollar difference to me, but I understand not everyone feels the same way.

It's the attitude that my pc is garbage because I didn't research it elsewhere and spend less is all that I find silly. That's all.

The problem is that it's not a $200 difference. The average mid-level custom rig costs anywhere between $800-900, and would be the equivalent to a $2000-2500++ retail "gaming" machine from HP/Dell/Alienware. I dunno about you, but saving $1200-1600 is time well spent.

Edited, Jan 26th 2011 1:11pm by SoumaKyou


my Hp 'gaming rig' cost 900 dollars :

AMD Phenom II 1045 six-core processor
ATI Radeon HD 5570
8GB DDR3 and a terabyte hard drive
windows 7 home premium 64 bit


See but that is a terrible video card... why have a six core processor with a crummy videocard? This is what I was saying about retail rigs - they give you one good thing and then ***** you on the other. 5570 is at the bottom of the passmark chart: http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html

And the worst thing is they prolly crammed a crummy power supply in there so you can't even fit a better card in.
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lolgaxe wrote:
When it comes to sitting around not doing anything for long periods of time, only being active for short windows, and marginal changes and sidegrades I'd say FFXI players were the perfect choice for politicians.


#26 Jan 26 2011 at 12:34 PM Rating: Good
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I guess the difference is that the game looks gorgeous, so this crummy card really does exactly what I need: plays ffxiv. I'm a console gamer, this is the only PC game I play. Specs and things are numbers to me. . I just don't get it and I don't want to spend time trying to get it. I'm stubborn, I want what works and I want to move on with my life lol.
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#27 Jan 26 2011 at 1:27 PM Rating: Excellent
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olaurelindorenan wrote:
I guess the difference is that the game looks gorgeous, so this crummy card really does exactly what I need: plays ffxiv. I'm a console gamer, this is the only PC game I play. Specs and things are numbers to me. . I just don't get it and I don't want to spend time trying to get it. I'm stubborn, I want what works and I want to move on with my life lol.


I'm not trying to be condescending, so please don't take it that way, even though my post will probably come off as such, it's not intentional, I promise.

I'm glad that you're happy with your purchase, and that you feel that your purchase does what you want it to do for a price you feel is reasonable. You're not alone in this boat of people who buy retail systems for gaming; I've spoken with many others who share the same mindset as you.

The reason that "computer people" (for lack of a better term) such as myself try to explain why retail systems are a poor choice is not a matter of elitism, although I admit that it does tend to come off that way. More often than not, most computer-minded folks love to educate. If you have a question, I'm usually quite honest about the answer, even if it's probably not the answer you wanted to hear. The suggestions I make are nearly always based on "What would I do if I were in your situation?" and when considering computer related purchases, I always put an emphasis on "value for the dollar", or "Am I getting what I'm paying for?" as opposed to "Am I happy with what I got for the amount I paid?", which is the way that your average layman views it.

As you said, specs are just numbers and really don't mean anything to -you-, which is why it's hard to accurately describe in non-technical terms why a given CPU or a given GPU is a poor choice. When you can't rely on "This GPU has a higher core clock" or "This RAM's bus speed is slower" or "The FSB speed of this motherboard isn't as good as the other one" or "The 24V Amperage on the PSU isn't enough for the GPU", etc... you have to explain things in nontechnical terms, and the easiest, most straightforward way of doing this is bu using the terms "good" and "bad", extremely relatively.

Going technical for a minute, your 5570 is great compared to, say, integrated graphics, but a 5770 would have been a much much better choice. I know you don't understand the difference (Although I would be willing to try to explain if you'd like), so the problem is, you have to take my word for it.

Most people who are not tech savvy look at computers in two regards only:

1) Is it slow?
2) Does it do what I want it do do?

Beyond that, they usually find anything else irrelevant.

Comparatively, someone like myself who makes a living in IT looks at the following:

1) Am I getting what I'm paying for?
2) How can I make it -better-, and is the cost/benefit ratio worth it for the increase?
3) What is the optimal configuration to get a good overall value and still get the highest performance I can manage for that price?

If what you're looking for is someone to tell you "What should I buy?" then a lot of people will not mind talking with you about your budget and working with a reasonable budget to accomplish an end result that it usually -better- than what you were expecting.

In fact, I've even personally walked someone through building a computer themselves over IRC. It's a daunting task when you look at the big picture (I have a walkthrough in my journal if you're interested, even if you're not currently in the market for a computer) but if you approach it step by step, I think you'll find that in the end you're often glad that you tried something new. Especially since you say you're an artist, I can't help but feel you'd end up with a smile on your face and a sense of accomplishment when you can look at your system and say "I built that myself." Your friends will be totally jealous and everything (okay, maybe not).

So it's not that people are trying to belittle your purchase, it just pains someone like me to say "I spent $900 on this" when you could have gotten a better system for the same price or the same system for a lower price. Again, I'm not trying to be elitist or condescending, I just personally take joy in seeing someone who started by knowing very little about what they wanted walk away with a computer they built themselves and a few hundred bucks in their pocket.

You say you're happy with your computer for now, and that's totally fine. But my honest suggestion to you is that the next time you decide you want a new system, ask for help and you'll usually find people who are willing to help you every step of the way by answering questions or, if you prefer, just telling you "Buy this." I'm 95% sure that if you ever decide to try it in the future, you'll get a few headaches and feel a little overwhelmed at first, but you'll end up knowing more than you did before, with a smile on your face, a bit of pride, and you'll be glad you did.

If you don't want to take that advice at all, then I accept that. But I just wanted you to know where people are coming from, since "IT folk" (myself included) have a knack for being known as rude and elitist when it comes to these types of things.
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Mikhalia: and FWIW, my posts are 95% helpful, informative, or funny.
Mikhalia: only 5% or less of my posts are utter crap.
Tyapex: 393 posts of utter crap...
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#28 Jan 26 2011 at 1:50 PM Rating: Good
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Yeah, thats kind of the point I'm making..they spent 1k for roughly 2/3 of what I got for 500..and I paid someone else to make it for me in that 500. Granted, they were using said money to make a new gaming PC for themselves.

Getting a decent PC is easy, getting a decent price is harder, but even more important. If you want a decent price, never ever ever ever ever ever buy from HP, Dell, etc. Get custom-made by one of the custom gaming PC sites or a person who does it themselves.
#29 Jan 26 2011 at 2:26 PM Rating: Good
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Tridant wrote:
Yes or no question.
Can i even play ffxiv with my specs?


Quote:
Video adapter
Intel ® Graphics Media Accelerator 950 with 64MB dedicated graphics memory


no.
#30 Jan 26 2011 at 2:36 PM Rating: Excellent
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11,539 posts
Uryuu wrote:
Yeah, thats kind of the point I'm making..they spent 1k for roughly 2/3 of what I got for 500..and I paid someone else to make it for me in that 500. Granted, they were using said money to make a new gaming PC for themselves.

Getting a decent PC is easy, getting a decent price is harder, but even more important. If you want a decent price, never ever ever ever ever ever buy from HP, Dell, etc. Get custom-made by one of the custom gaming PC sites or a person who does it themselves.


That's another hangup there is that techie folks have much different interpretations of "bad", "decent", and "good" than non techie folks.

To a techie:

Good = Mid to high end performance at a reasonable price. Would buy it for themselves.
Decent = Low to mid end performance and/or costs a little more than it's worth. Would probably advise against buying this.
Bad = Low end performance or lower and/or costs WAY more than it's worth. Wouldn't be caught dead with this.

To a non-techie:

Good = Does not appear slow. Seems to do most of what is needed.
Decent = Slow at times, some things don't operate as expected.
Bad = Frustratingly slow and more things don't work correctly than do.
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Mikhalia: and FWIW, my posts are 95% helpful, informative, or funny.
Mikhalia: only 5% or less of my posts are utter crap.
Tyapex: 393 posts of utter crap...
Mikhalia: Sounds about right.
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