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#52 Mar 18 2011 at 8:15 PM Rating: Decent
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burtonsnow wrote:
Still, it is very unlikely to become packed tightly enough to reach what is known as critical mass and start a chain reaction. The plutonium would qualify as weapons grade only if a large quantity was packed together.


It takes a lot of advanced, precision engineering to create a nuclear bomb. It involves a carefully controlled type of explosion that simply couldn't happen by accident (otherwise a lot more countries would have nukes). There's no chance of a "mushroom cloud" here in the slightest.

That doesn't mean explosions aren't possible. The fuel rods and spent fuel are extremely hot and remain so for a long time. They have to be constantly cooled or they will start melting through the bottom of the reactor. When really hot metal suddenly comes in contact with cool concrete, with concrete would explode taking harmful radioactive material with it and polluting the area.

This is really the scenario they're desperately trying to prevent. The more loss of containment of the nuclear materials that occur, the more dire and lasting the consequences become.
#53 Mar 18 2011 at 8:19 PM Rating: Excellent
********* Dai-ichi 19th March: Power line connected to reactor #2 - By ktwop
http://ktwop.wordpress.com/2011/03/18/**********************************************************

Quote:
Saturday 19th March: Day 8 after the quake and tsunami

0800 JST (0000 CET): Checks are presumed to be ongoing before any attempt to turn power back on. Not only must the equipment integrity be checked but the possibility of short circuits and any volatile matter which could ignite must be eliminated as well. The next round of spraying will be at noon.

0600 JST (2200 CET): Reuters reports: Working inside a 12 mile evacuation zone at ********** nearly 300 exhausted engineers were focused on trying to restore power at pumps in four of the reactors.
Another 1,480 meters (5,000 feet) of cable are being laid inside the complex before engineers try to crank up the coolers at reactor No. 2, followed by 1, 3 and 4 this weekend, company officials added. Should that work , it will be a turning point. “If they can get those electric pumps on and they can start pushing that water successfully up the core, quite slowly so you don’t cause any brittle failure, they should be able to get it under control in the next couple of days,” said Laurence Williams, of Britain’s University of Central Lancashire.


Some new developments have been reported by IAEA:

IAEA Briefing on ********* Nuclear Emergency (18 March 2011, 14:00 UTC) - IAEA
http://www.facebook.com/notes/international-atomic-energy-agency-iaea/iaea-briefing-on-******************************************************************

Quote:
Another positive development is that diesel generators are providing power for cooling for both Units 5 and 6.

All reactor Units at ********* Daini are now in a cold shut down condition.








#54 Mar 18 2011 at 8:58 PM Rating: Excellent
Screenshot


Screenshot
(Click for full image.)

It is not the intention of this thread to discuss worst case scenarios, but rather to report facts. However, I can understand why people would want to at least attempt to understand potential dangers. It is hard to find reliable sources for this information, as everyone and their brother have suddenly become nuclear physicists in the last week. Perhaps that is not entirely a bad thing.

First a bit of background on mixed oxide, or MOX, used by Reactor #3 (see chart above).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOX_fuel

MOX: The ********* Word of the Day and Why it's Bad News - TIME
Posted by Jeffrey Kluger
http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2011/03/17/mox-the-***********************************************
Quote:
Plutonium is a natural byproduct of radioactive decay and spent fuel rods are thus full of the stuff. You can always put them into long term storage for a few dozen millennia—which is where most spent rods have to go–but you can also reprocess some of the waste and combine it with pricier uranium for a cheaper and still energy-intensive rod. With nuclear power still more expensive than fossil fuels like coal, manufacturers need to save where they can to remain competitive, and MOX is a good budget cutter.

Plutonium In Fuel Rods: Cause For Concern? - NPR
by DAN CHARLES
http://www.npr.org/2011/03/16/134600825/plutonium-in-fuel-rods-cause-for-concern?ps=cprs
Quote:
Some outside experts are particularly concerned about high levels of plutonium in one of the damaged Japanese reactors. About 6 percent of the fuel rods in reactor No. 3 at the ********* Dai-ichi power plant are made from so-called "mixed-oxide" (MOX) fuel, which contains plutonium as well as uranium.

According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, MOX fuel presents particular risks in an accident.

For one thing, it melts at a slightly lower temperature.

In addition, plutonium is a particularly long-lived and toxic material. The half-life of plutonium-239 is 24,000 years, so if it escaped in smoke from a burning reactor and contaminated soil downwind, it would remain hazardous for tens of thousands of years.

But officials at the International Atomic Energy Agency say the presence of MOX fuel does not add significantly to the dangers.

Denis Flory, a top safety official at the agency, pointed out that all used nuclear fuel contains plutonium. It forms naturally within conventional uranium fuel as the uranium is bombarded by neutrons.

And although plutonium is a long-lived emitter of radiation, it is also quite heavy, so it is not likely to move very far downwind from its source.


Edited, Mar 18th 2011 11:26pm by SmashingtonWho
#55 Mar 18 2011 at 9:39 PM Rating: Good
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That MOX article you linked to mentions that Reactor 3 uses something different in it's fuel rods, but then goes on to say that Reactor 4 uses MOX in it's rods. Typo, or did TEPCO secretly use cost-cutting measures in several reactors and keeping quiet about it?
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#56 Mar 18 2011 at 11:11 PM Rating: Good
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http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/18/*****************
Something I wonder about is why don't they use inspection helicopters to see what is up with the reactor buildings. These machines are about the size of a small scooter, and have a camera on board. Perhaps getting the operator close enough to the site is the issue.

Edited, Mar 18th 2011 10:18pm by AekaMasaki
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#57 Mar 18 2011 at 11:47 PM Rating: Excellent
AekaMasaki wrote:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/18/*****************
Something I wonder about is why don't they use inspection helicopters to see what is up with the reactor buildings. These machines are about the size of a small scooter, and have a camera on board. Perhaps getting the operator close enough to the site is the issue.


Here you go AekaMasaki. The link at the bottom of that article leads to this:

Top US nuke engineer slams US gov advice on evacuation - TheRegister
By Lewis Page
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/18/***************************
Quote:
Higher levels are detected by aircraft above the buildings because the steel-lined rooftop pools are shining short-ranged radiation straight up: this is why helicopters do not linger above them.


Quote:
The renowned US nuclear engineer Ted Rockwell, who quite literally wrote the book on reactor safety, has harsh words for this position. He writes:

[Consider] the Three Mile Island (TMI) incident, where 10 to 20 tons of the nuclear reactor melted down, slumped to the bottom of the reactor vessel, and initiated the dreaded China Syndrome, where the reactor core melts and burns its way into the earth ... In the real world, the molten mass froze when it hit the colder reactor vessel, and stopped its downward journey at five-eights of an inch through the five-inch thick vessel wall.
And there was no harm to people or the environment. None.

Yet in Japan, you have radiation zealots threatening to order people out of their homes, to wander, homeless and panic-stricken, through the battered countryside, to do what? All to avoid a radiation dose lower than what they would get from a ski trip.


Edited, Mar 19th 2011 1:53am by SmashingtonWho
#58 Mar 19 2011 at 12:19 AM Rating: Good
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I read that same article. To date, no significant radiation has been released, and no one has died from radiation. Long term health issues will likely be minor if the Japanese get the situation under control, which they seem to be doing.
The other issue is all the contamination in the flooded areas which have all sorts of chemical pollution from the washed out petrochemical storage tanks, the sewage, and god knows what.
NHK is now talking about a pin point fire fighting device that reaches very high and can drop water on a target. This is the pool filler I think.

Edited, Mar 18th 2011 11:35pm by AekaMasaki
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#59 Mar 19 2011 at 1:02 AM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
Quote:
The renowned US nuclear engineer Ted Rockwell, who quite literally wrote the book on reactor safety, has harsh words for this position. He writes:

[Consider] the Three Mile Island (TMI) incident, where 10 to 20 tons of the nuclear reactor melted down, slumped to the bottom of the reactor vessel, and initiated the dreaded China Syndrome, where the reactor core melts and burns its way into the earth ... In the real world, the molten mass froze when it hit the colder reactor vessel, and stopped its downward journey at five-eights of an inch through the five-inch thick vessel wall.
And there was no harm to people or the environment. None.


Well, it's good to know that there are differing opinions. And certainly the experts who've I've heard with more a more dire assessment were pretty adamant themselves and certainly qualified in their own right. To be honest, because cancer is a terminal illness, I would err on the side of abundant caution on this issue, even if it doesn't turn out to be necessary. You only live once.

The situation is not stable, and TEPCO itself has been caught downplaying the situation far too much and withholding information. Because we don't know just how bad it is, then we need to prepare for it to be really bad. The fact they are conceding they might need to consider burying the reactors tells me that all is not so rosy.
#60 Mar 19 2011 at 1:55 AM Rating: Default
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TEPCO's like Japan's BP. Now all we need is some bigshot CEO to come out and be all like Tony "I want my life back" Hayward. Also if these reactors are rendered unusable after this event, how on earth are TEPCO planning to restore the power grid to normality by the 24th?
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#61 Mar 19 2011 at 3:14 AM Rating: Decent
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Riniaru wrote:
TEPCO's like Japan's BP. Now all we need is some bigshot CEO to come out and be all like Tony "I want my life back" Hayward. Also if these reactors are rendered unusable after this event, how on earth are TEPCO planning to restore the power grid to normality by the 24th?


Your wish is my command.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1367684/Nuclear-plant-chief-weeps-Japanese-finally-admit-radiation-leak-kill-people.html#ixzz1GyXQhfmE
#62 Mar 19 2011 at 10:24 AM Rating: Excellent
Japan cites progress in efforts to stabilize ********* Daiichi nuclear plant - The Washington Post
By David Nakamura, Saturday, March 19, 11:15 AM
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/japan-boosts-efforts-to-regain-control-of-unstable-*************************************************************


Quote:
TOKYO — Japanese officials said Saturday that progress was being made toward stabilizing the rapidly deteriorating ********* Daiichi nuclear plant as workers raced to restore electrical power to portions of the facility and set up an automated water cannon to drench two reactors for up to seven consecutive hours.

Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said the renewed attempts to regain control of ********* Daiichi had shown signs of success at the plant’s No. 3 nuclear reactor, the highest priority for officials aiming to cool spent fuel rods that have begun spewing radioactive material into the atmosphere. But he acknowledged that the gains could be temporary.

“As of now, we cannot say anything definite, but we think we have succeeded in putting a certain level of water in Unit 3 and we think that it is in a certain stable situation,” Edano said at a news conference. “We have been able to prevent the situation from worsening . . . but I believe we are reaching a big turning point.”

Attempts to restore power had progressed, Edano said, but he added, “We must also be careful in whether equipments will work once connected.”

At the ********* Daiichi plant, emergency crews set up a fire truck with a 70-foot-tall water cannon that sprayed three tons of seawater a minute on the No. 3 reactor. No. 3 is the only one of the plant’s six reactors to use plutonium, which is considered more dangerous than uranium.

The spraying, which did not require human beings to be present in the zone of elevated radiation, began at about 2 p.m. Saturday local time and was to continue for about seven hours, officials said, with the water split between reactors No. 3 and No. 4


Someone had a good idea!
#63 Mar 20 2011 at 10:52 AM Rating: Default
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AekaMasaki wrote:
I read that same article. To date, no significant radiation has been released, and no one has died from radiation. Long term health issues will likely be minor if the Japanese get the situation under control, which they seem to be doing.
The other issue is all the contamination in the flooded areas which have all sorts of chemical pollution from the washed out petrochemical storage tanks, the sewage, and god knows what.
NHK is now talking about a pin point fire fighting device that reaches very high and can drop water on a target. This is the pool filler I think.

Edited, Mar 18th 2011 11:35pm by AekaMasaki


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hcBGSr9QGk&feature=feedf

I wish media would stop UNDERPLAYING the severity of such a disaster. Toxic rain in California right now, I'm staying inside today.
#64 Mar 20 2011 at 11:12 AM Rating: Good
burtonsnow wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hcBGSr9QGk&feature=feedf

I wish media would stop UNDERPLAYING the severity of such a disaster. Toxic rain in California right now, I'm staying inside today.


30 minutes of some old white guy talking about birds and caterpillars? He shows us a map with some moving colors and finally gets to the point: It's going to have an effect.

Well no f**king sh*t! Thanks man, next time I'll take the abridged version.

"All I can say is 'Good luck'."

I wish that had been all he said.
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#65 Mar 20 2011 at 11:14 AM Rating: Excellent
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Quote:
I wish media would stop UNDERPLAYING the severity of such a disaster.


This... is... sigworthy.
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We really want to compete against World of Warcraft and for example the new Star Wars MMO.

#66 Mar 20 2011 at 11:19 AM Rating: Good
Hyanmen wrote:
Quote:
I wish media would stop UNDERPLAYING the severity of such a disaster.


This... is... sigworthy.


I hope you mean because of its ironic nature.
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#67 Mar 20 2011 at 11:25 AM Rating: Decent
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mattkujata wrote:
burtonsnow wrote:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hcBGSr9QGk&feature=feedf

I wish media would stop UNDERPLAYING the severity of such a disaster. Toxic rain in California right now, I'm staying inside today.


30 minutes of some old white guy talking about birds and caterpillars? He shows us a map with some moving colors and finally gets to the point: It's going to have an effect.

Well no f**king sh*t! Thanks man, next time I'll take the abridged version.

"All I can say is 'Good luck'."

I wish that had been all he said.


When media outlets OUTRIGHT LIE, the best you can do is get opinions based on factual data, regardless of length. I'm glad he laid out the scenario as is, citing documented facts about the negative effects of low level radiation such as we are experiencing now. The detail he provides is essential to understanding the breadth of effects. Right now we are being told everything is ok, but I guess my definition of OK is different than theirs, because the situation right now is not ok. Sorry for being so grave, but I do not wish to delude the situation like our governments feel the need to do.

Radiation levels have been found 27 times higher than normal in spinach 100km south of **********
http://e.nikkei.com/e/fr/tnks/Nni20110320D20JF510.htm
#68 Mar 20 2011 at 11:28 AM Rating: Good
I agree, there will be effects. The bird study was fascinating, I suppose, that thing was just SOOOO long.
#69 Mar 20 2011 at 6:08 PM Rating: Good
Monday morning news.

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20110321a1.html






Edited, Mar 20th 2011 8:08pm by mattkujata
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#70 Mar 20 2011 at 6:28 PM Rating: Good
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Riniaru wrote:
Also if these reactors are rendered unusable after this event, how on earth are TEPCO planning to restore the power grid to normality by the 24th?


I doubt they'll be able to restore the grid to normal operations by the 24th. IIRC, units 4, 5, and 6 were down for maintenance, so they'll likely be brought back up at some point, seeing as their reactors weren't flooded with sea water. However, I doubt that day is going to be the 24th.
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#71 Mar 21 2011 at 2:45 AM Rating: Good
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Workers are being evacuated after smoke starting rising from the reactor. I really think the situation is a lot more grim then they have been leading on. I wish for the best obviously. It's a shame seeing how this is playing out even after the events of Chernobyl.
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#72 Mar 21 2011 at 6:36 AM Rating: Good
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Moxley wrote:
Workers are being evacuated after smoke starting rising from the reactor. I really think the situation is a lot more grim then they have been leading on. I wish for the best obviously. It's a shame seeing how this is playing out even after the events of Chernobyl.


Thats too bad. I have been following the Aljazeera site before I went to sleep some time ago, and to wake up and see that smoke is coming out of the 3rd reactor is disheartening. I am still hopeful that having power connected to 2,5,and 6 will help the situation out.
#73 Mar 21 2011 at 1:05 PM Rating: Excellent
Australian robotic equipment to aid in water dousing reactors - The Australian
By: Peter Alford
http://www.theaustralian.com.au/australian-robotic-equipment-to-aid-in-water-dousing-reactors/story-fn84naht-1226025692481

Quote:
FOUR reactors at the crippled ********* Daiichi power plant remained in hazardous condition last night, as emergency workers awaited special robotic equipment from Australia to improve the accuracy of their water-dousing efforts.

The remote-controlled water spraying machine, owned by US contractor Bechtel, was being flown from Perth by an RAAF Hercules transport.

...

However only the least damaged, No 5, is receiving power from the electricity grid. Circuits and damaged equipment at the other five reactors were still being checked.

TEPCO officials said it might take several more days before power was turned on at No 2, where the reactor containment vessel appears to have suffered significant damage.

...

The Japanese government has asked municipalities to halt export shipments of leafy vegetables and milk, which are the food most at risk of radioactive contamination.

The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare said yesterday it detected 965 becquerels of iodine in 1kg of tap water in the village of Iitate, ********* Prefecture. That was more than three times higher than the government-regulated limit, and residents have been told to refrain from drinking tap water.


According to the link posted by mattkujata:
Electricity restored at reactor No. 2 - The Japan Times
By MASAMI ITO and JUN HONGO

Quote:
The No. 2 reactor is the first of the six to have power restored from outside the plant.

Tepco will first try to turn on the lights in the central control room before moving to power up instruments that measure pressure, temperature and radiation inside the reactor. If successful, the next step will be to turn on the cooling systems.

Also critical is determining whether any equipment was destroyed by the earthquake or seawater.

...

In addition to rebooting the cooling system, Tepco hopes it can get a detailed picture of the damage once electricity in the power plant's central control room is restored.

Tepco said it succeeded in bringing power cables to reactors 1 and 2 but hadn't completed the necessary checks to restart equipment.

The operator can't restart the cooling systems for the reactors until it confirms the damage to the transformers, motors, pumps and other gear, a Tepco official said, adding that it was unlikely the procedures would be finished by the end of Sunday.


Edited, Mar 21st 2011 3:43pm by SmashingtonWho
#74 Mar 21 2011 at 3:33 PM Rating: Good
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A couple interesting updates:

Quote:
the Japanese government has just raised the decontamination threshold by nearly 20 times from 6,000 cpm to a stunning 100,000 cpm

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/nhk-finally-confirms-fuel-damage-radioactive-rain-starts-pour-and-japan-increases-decontamin


One of my favorite physicists (Michio Kaku):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fz3jYl8YOys&feature=player_embedded


Some more HAARP BS:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZgG9hU07ps&feature=player_embedded




*edit*
Also there was an article I was reading earlier, it seems the pumps for reactor 2 are not in working order. I'll try to find the article and link.


*edit2*
Oh I forgot this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nbEFhPVM_k&feature=player_embedded

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 5:35pm by burtonsnow

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 5:50pm by burtonsnow
#75 Mar 21 2011 at 4:18 PM Rating: Excellent
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**edit** - sorry for crappy formatting, i spent ages aligning it but when I post it was not retained ;;

Posting this to illustrate the massive difference in radioactivity between this incident and Chernobyl. I have been following the Japan Nuclear crisis and am so glad it looks like it is getting under control and metdown is unlikely.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12809832 - unsure why other news networks are saying cooling systems not working - BBC reporting them as not tested yet. Hope they work now power has been restored to 3 of 6 reactors.

These are whole Sieverts not milli or micro which is much smaller as you well know.

Location Radiation (roentgens per hour) Sieverts per hour (SI Unit)
Vicinity of the reactor core 30,000 300
Fuel fragments 15,000–20,000 150-200
Debris heap at the place of circulation pumps 10,000 100
Debris near the electrolyzers 5,000–15,000 50-150
Water in the Level +25 feedwater room 5,000 50
Level 0 of the turbine hall 500–15,000 5-150
Area of the affected unit 1,000–1,500 10-15
Water in Room 712 1,000 10
Control room, shortly after explosion 3–5 .03-.05
Gidroelektromontazh depot 30 .3
Nearby concrete mixing unit 10–15 .10-.15


Quick pause for thought as well while we are talking about this subject.

The sarcophagus that was built back in 1986, was only designed to last 20-30 years, it has to be replaced or repaired by 2020.
In 2013 the New Safe Confinement is due to be finished - but how is that actually progressing??

Does anyone honestly know?? I saw a documentary on this recently that implied that Russia and the Ukraine could not afford it, and the Internatonal community didn;t really give a monkies. Naturally I was sceptical about the documentary, my question is genuine, how is that **** building actually progressing?


Edited, Mar 21st 2011 6:34pm by MisterGaribaldi

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 6:37pm by MisterGaribaldi
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#76 Mar 21 2011 at 4:56 PM Rating: Good
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MisterGaribaldi wrote:
**edit** - sorry for crappy formatting, i spent ages aligning it but when I post it was not retained ;;

Posting this to illustrate the massive difference in radioactivity between this incident and Chernobyl. I have been following the Japan Nuclear crisis and am so glad it looks like it is getting under control and metdown is unlikely.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12809832 - unsure why other news networks are saying cooling systems not working - BBC reporting them as not tested yet. Hope they work now power has been restored to 3 of 6 reactors.

These are whole Sieverts not milli or micro which is much smaller as you well know.

Location Radiation (roentgens per hour) Sieverts per hour (SI Unit)
Vicinity of the reactor core 30,000 300
Fuel fragments 15,000–20,000 150-200
Debris heap at the place of circulation pumps 10,000 100
Debris near the electrolyzers 5,000–15,000 50-150
Water in the Level +25 feedwater room 5,000 50
Level 0 of the turbine hall 500–15,000 5-150
Area of the affected unit 1,000–1,500 10-15
Water in Room 712 1,000 10
Control room, shortly after explosion 3–5 .03-.05
Gidroelektromontazh depot 30 .3
Nearby concrete mixing unit 10–15 .10-.15


Quick pause for thought as well while we are talking about this subject.

The sarcophagus that was built back in 1986, was only designed to last 20-30 years, it has to be replaced or repaired by 2020.
In 2013 the New Safe Confinement is due to be finished - but how is that actually progressing??

Does anyone honestly know?? I saw a documentary on this recently that implied that Russia and the Ukraine could not afford it, and the Internatonal community didn;t really give a monkies. Naturally I was sceptical about the documentary, my question is genuine, how is that **** building actually progressing?


Edited, Mar 21st 2011 6:34pm by MisterGaribaldi

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 6:37pm by MisterGaribaldi


Very interesting information MrGari, do you happen to know the SI measurements for the Chernobyl incident? It would be great if we could compare side by side the outputs.

As a note to other posters, if you quote his post the formatting works great and it is much easier to read.


In regards to the New Safe Confinement I haven't heard anything recently, it seems like it is still moving forward...and if we really don't give a monkies, maybe we should before there isn't an earth left to type this response on.
#77 Mar 21 2011 at 5:23 PM Rating: Good
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The most relevant and bloody shocking information would relate to debris that had to be cleared from the roof, before the sarcophagus could be built.

Fuel Fragments (which included part of the graphite reactor core which was also on the roof) - emitted 150-200 Sieverts an hour. Kind of puts things in perspective hey!!

Teams of workers - "Human Robots" they were termed - had to shovel this debris from the roof. Working in teams, in very heavy lead lined suits, they would rush onto the roof for 1 minute and clear as much as they could.

The unit used to measure radioactivity has changed from Roentgens to Sieverts, these appear to be a hundredth of the size of Roentgens. Any figures you see measuring radiactivity for Chernobyl, divide by 100 and it will be a very close approximation in Sieverts. But remember Japan are only measuring Micro and Milli which is fractional again.

It is also really hard to find accurate information about actual level of radiation in surrounding areas. The main difference is the reactor exploded and was belching radiation. Massive amounts of radioactive iodine were released as dust, into the water system and clouds, into food etc etc etc. Very innaccurate records were kept and the unit of measurment changing make researching it accurately very tricky. Soviet estimates of worker exposure were also a joke, in many cases their estimates were at least out by a factor of 10...........

The discovery channel did an excellent documentary on Chernobyl if you ever get the chance to watch it.

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 7:36pm by MisterGaribaldi

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 7:40pm by MisterGaribaldi
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#78 Mar 21 2011 at 5:48 PM Rating: Decent
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just found the quote on the reactor #2 water pump:

Quote:
In another setback, the plant's operator said Monday it had just discovered that some of the cooling system's key pumps at the complex's troubled Unit 2 are no longer functional — meaning replacements have to be brought in. Tokyo Electric Power Co. said it had placed emergency orders for new pumps, but how long it would take for them to arrive was unclear.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110321/ap_on_bi_ge/as_japan_earthquake


Full article on the pump:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/2011/03/21/2011-03-21_smoke_from_japanese_nuclear_plants_reactor_forces_evacuation_of_fukushima_daiich.html

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 8:13pm by burtonsnow
#79 Mar 21 2011 at 5:56 PM Rating: Decent
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MisterGaribaldi wrote:
The most relevant and bloody shocking information would relate to debris that had to be cleared from the roof, before the sarcophagus could be built.

Fuel Fragments (which included part of the graphite reactor core which was also on the roof) - emitted 150-200 Sieverts an hour. Kind of puts things in perspective hey!!

Teams of workers - "Human Robots" they were termed - had to shovel this debris from the roof. Working in teams, in very heavy lead lined suits, they would rush onto the roof for 1 minute and clear as much as they could.

The unit used to measure radioactivity has changed from Roentgens to Sieverts, these appear to be a hundredth of the size of Roentgens. Any figures you see measuring radiactivity for Chernobyl, divide by 100 and it will be a very close approximation in Sieverts. But remember Japan are only measuring Micro and Milli which is fractional again.

It is also really hard to find accurate information about actual level of radiation in surrounding areas. The main difference is the reactor exploded and was belching radiation. Massive amounts of radioactive iodine were released as dust, into the water system and clouds, into food etc etc etc. Very innaccurate records were kept and the unit of measurment changing make researching it accurately very tricky. Soviet estimates of worker exposure were also a joke, in many cases their estimates were at least out by a factor of 10...........

The discovery channel did an excellent documentary on Chernobyl if you ever get the chance to watch it.

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 7:36pm by MisterGaribaldi

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 7:40pm by MisterGaribaldi


Based on your first post which mentions the readings are in Sieverts and not mSv or microSv, it seems like the levels are very similar to Chernobyl. Obviously those levels would have to be sustained, but it is quite difficult to get accurate information about what is happening at the plants right now.

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 8:01pm by burtonsnow
#80 Mar 21 2011 at 6:12 PM Rating: Decent
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some more:

Quote:
In a report issued nine days before the earthquake and tsunami struck, Japan’s nuclear safety agency criticized Tokyo Electric for repeatedly failing to make inspections of critical equipment, the Associated Press reported Monday. The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) cited the company for ignoring inspection schedules and failing to examine 33 pieces of equipment at ********* Daiichi, including crucial cooling system parts, emergency diesel generators in unit 3, pumps for reactors in units 1 and 2 and generator equipment for unit 4, AP said.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/japan_earthquake_and_tsunami_caused_up_to_235_billion_in_damages_world_bank_says/2011/03/21/ABtzwn4_story.html?wprss=rss_homepage

BTW this is not new, top nuclear physicists at GE quit its nuclear research program after issues were addressed with the Mark I design and they were ignored (which is the same design at the Dai-Ichi plant)



More radiation Monitoring:
http://blog.alexanderhiggins.com/net2/japan-nuclear-plume-radiation-map.aspx

Edited, Mar 21st 2011 8:18pm by burtonsnow
#81 Mar 22 2011 at 4:37 PM Rating: Decent
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Bleh, more of this crap....I hope this ends soon I am becoming downtrodden at all this news :( I would say the situation was not handled as it should have been. I really urge everyone to protest nuclear power in any way possible.


http://www.counterpunch.org/takashi03222011.html
#82 Mar 23 2011 at 11:35 AM Rating: Excellent
March 23, 2011

********* Nuclear Accident Update Log - IAEA
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html

Quote:
Units 1 and 2
Reactor cooling systems at these units are severely hampered. There is suspected damage to the nuclear fuel in both units. Workers successfully connected off-site electrical supplies to a transformer at Unit 2 on 19 March and later to at least one electrical distribution panel inside the plant. Technicians are conducting diagnostic tests to determine the integrity of the reactor's electrical systems.
...
Units 3 and 4
Reactor cooling systems at Unit 3 are severely hampered. There is suspected damage to the reactor's fuel, and the condition of its spent fuel pool is uncertain. Unit 4 had been shut down for routine maintenance - and all its fuel was removed to the reactor building's spent fuel pool - prior to the earthquake. There is therefore no concern about fuel in the reactor core, but considerable concern about the fuel in the spent fuel pool.
...
Units 5 and 6
Both units had been shut down for routine maintenance prior to the earthquake, reducing their cooling needs somewhat, but not entirely. On 17 March operators were able to start one of the Unit 6 diesel generators. On 19 March, workers successfully connected the second diesel generator in Unit 6. The two generators were used to power cooling systems in both reactors, which then achieved a safe, cold shutdown configuration. Off-site power was restored to Unit 5 on 21 March.

As power is restored, workers will perform checks to make certain the conditions are safe to restart individual components. They will check for grounds and ensure circuits remain intact. If damage is discovered, a decision will have to be made whether to perform repairs or move on to the next component on a prioritised list. Nuclear reactors, especially safety related equipment, incorporate multiple layers of redundancy. So a problem in one component does not necessarily mean a specific safety function will be unrecoverable. It is more likely that operators will move on to the redundant equipment in an effort to determine the most intact system and focus their restoration efforts there. This process takes time.


A saw a very important comment made by Hirose Takashi in the link provided by burtonsnow:

What They're Covering Up at ************* - counterpunch
By: HIROSE TAKASHI
http://www.counterpunch.org/takashi03222011.html

Quote:
Hirose: . . . If you want to cool a reactor down with water, [b]you have to circulate the water inside and carry the heat away, otherwise it has no meaning. So the only solution is to reconnect the electricity. Otherwise it’s like pouring water on lava.


This distinction of circulated water instead of standing water is essential. Because of this, spraying water into the storage pools is largely ineffectual, and certainly only temporary.

Edited, Mar 23rd 2011 7:05pm by SmashingtonWho
#83 Mar 23 2011 at 12:24 PM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
Japan needs this power plant to get back online, or else continue to suffer power shortages during this crucial initial recovery phase.


It's really not as important as containing radiation leaks which is far more harmful (and already ruining the water and food supply). With the extent of the damage at the site, I'm highly skeptical it will ever be used to generate electricity again.

Mind you, new reactors go for billions of dollars a pop, so I can understand why they'd like to salvage these if possible. However, the unsafe, outdated design which led to all these problems in the first place has to weigh heavily on even considering continued use.
#84 Mar 23 2011 at 2:23 PM Rating: Excellent
EDIT: This post has been removed.

The ********* Daiichi plant is only one of many reasons why the power shortages continue in Japan.

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 12:01am by SmashingtonWho
#85 Mar 23 2011 at 3:01 PM Rating: Excellent
From the TEPCO press release:
http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/11032306-e.html
Quote:
Implementation plan of rolling blackouts from Friday, March 25 to
Wednesday, March 30.

Currently, blackouts are scheduled to continue through March 30.

From the TEPCO press release (March 23):
http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/11032303-e.html

Quote:
From around 3:10 pm on March 22nd, water was sprayed to Unit 3 by Tokyo
Fire Department's Fire Rescue Task Forces and Osaka City Fire Department
was conducted and completed at approximately 4:00 pm on the same day.
From around 5:20 pm on March 22nd, water was sprayed to Unit 4 using the
concrete pumping vehicle and it was finished at around 8:30 pm on the
same day.
-At approximately 10:00 am on March 23rd, we started spraying water to
Unit 4 using the concrete pumping vehicle
.


Edited, Mar 23rd 2011 11:59pm by SmashingtonWho
#86 Mar 23 2011 at 3:36 PM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
. Where will power come from if this plant is permanently disabled?


Just to clarify this: since they pumped in seawater to assist cooling, the plant is "doomed". It's not going to be operational ever again, even if they restart cooling, Reactor 2's torus is probably fractured and that means the entire reactor would need a complete overhaul. Also keep in mind, to put all the plant in security and assessing the real damage to the rods in the cores it's going to take weeks if not months. First they have to achieve cold shutdown in Reactor 1,2,3 (i.e. temp < 100 C), then stabilize the Spent Fuel Pools (SFPs) of reactor 1,2,3, and 4, then reduce the radiation levels to an acceptable level to work inside, then the cores need to be depressurized and finally you can look at the damage. For sure some rods may have been melted inside the core, rendering it useless. Add to that all the salts that seawater leaves after it evaporates and you get a good idea of the damage...Not to mention the actual corrosion to pumps, etc due to seawater.
Btw, it's highly unlikely the rods in the SFPs can melt, their zirconium alloy can whitstand 2000 C without melting, so the "issue" would be leaving a fire for days to cause problems.
And the concrete pump is used to pump water more accurately. Using the JDF and the fire squad pumps means:

1) at least 1/3 of it misses the target due to imprecise positioning (they're not made to do what they're doing);
2) The lack of proper training (since this is a situation that never happened before);
3) The other pumps need to be started and stopped. Not being continous means a lot of water is wasted.

The concrete pump is instead more precise. Hope this clears a few details.



Edited, Mar 23rd 2011 11:43pm by xizro
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#87 Mar 23 2011 at 3:57 PM Rating: Excellent
Xizro,
Thank you for commenting on what are certainly the most significant aspects of the current repair process. You seem to be familiar with the entirity of the situation.

xizro wrote:
It's not going to be operational ever again, even if they restart cooling...


I disagree. If they succeed in stabilizing the plant in the long run, I predict that reactors 5 and 6 would be put to use again at the very least. Also, I think that repair costs for the other reactors, while certainly extensive, would still be cheaper and become operational sooner than an alternative source of power can be put in place (for greater Japan that is).

It would be nice if an alternative solution was conceived. An additional source of power that would allow them to consider safety ahead of future implications for the country.

xizro wrote:
For sure some rods may have been melted inside the core, rendering it useless


Can I ask what makes you say this? I have not seen any reports of over-heated rods in the reactor cores yet. In fact, all 6 of the cores themselves have been reported to be in cold shutdown.

xizro wrote:
Btw, it's highly unlikely the rods in the SFPs can melt, their zirconium alloy can whitstand 2000 C without melting, so the "issue" would be leaving a fire for days to cause problems.


It is the escaping radiation that is leading officials to believe that the rods have been damaged. Where do you you think the radioactive emissions are coming from?

Please feel free to provide some links to your sources. I am looking for any available information.

Edited, Mar 23rd 2011 7:07pm by SmashingtonWho
#88 Mar 23 2011 at 4:10 PM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
Xizro,
Thank you for commenting on what are certainly the most significant aspects of the current repair process. You seem to be familiar with the entirity of the situation.


While I'm not exactly a nuclear physicist (I am a physicst, but different specializtion), I studied the matter for a while in the past. For this reason there may be a few inaccuracies in my discussion, even if I check beforehand.

xizro wrote:

I disagree. If the succeed in stabilizing the plant in the long run, I predict that reactors 5 and 6 would be put to use again at the very least. Also, I think that repair costs for the other reactors, while certainly extensive, would still be cheaper and become operational sooner than an alternative source of power can be put in place (for greater Japan that is).


Reactor 5 and 6 are mostly intact yes, but the others had seawater injection, meaning most of the equipment inside is either corroded for the salts or completely destroyed (they're using the fire extinguisher system to pump water in for now). Also the explosion in Reactor 2 may have fractured the torus (highly llikely), you'd need a total replacement and with a reactor that old (BWR and from the 70s) I don't think it's that economically feasible. Some also think that the salts may cause some issues in SFPs, but at present I'm not so sure about it.


Quote:


Can I ask what makes you say this? I have not seen any reports of over-heated rods in the reactor cores yet. In fact, all 6 of the cores themselves have been reported to be in cold shutdown.


At present, only reactor 5 and 6 of Daiichi and all of Daini are in cold shutdown (as per TEPCO statment), because the pumps are actually working (Daini had less issues with generators, and with 5 and 6 of Daiichi the diesel generator was first restarted, then power was connected to another pump - they did make a hole to avoid hydrogen accumulation).
There may have been some melting in the core of some rods, that would explain for some the H accumulation that lead to the explosions (not to mention, Reactor 2's explosion was much further inside the building than the other two). Nothing serious for health concerns, but enough to damage the core.


Quote:

It is the escaping radiation that is leading officials to believe that the rods have been damaged. Where do you you think the radioactive emissions are coming from?


The most probable explanation would be overheating that made some minor vaporization of small quantities of I-133 and Cesium. However until TEPCO can hook up the instrumentation that works it's hard to tell with just radiation data. The vapor that was made free by TEPCO in the earlier days of the crisis contained only N-16 and some noble gases, stuff with seconds or minutes of half-life-

Quote:

Please feel free to provide some links to your sources. I am looking for any available information.


I suggest http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/23/********************************** It's an excellent source of info based on facts and scientific data, not media.
Most important, the most recent statement by TEPCO shows that the generators were put higher than what media believed (about 14 m or so), but still not enough for a tsunami of that intensity. The fact that the plant still holds together after all that happened it's really a testament to the solidity of nuclear power plants. Also keep in mind this: the main issue with ********* was that they had an amazingly number of failsafe systems....But all required power to work. That's an issue that is solved already in new reactors, and the Mark IV generation is going for total passive system.


Edited, Mar 24th 2011 12:18am by xizro

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 12:22am by xizro
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#89 Mar 23 2011 at 4:21 PM Rating: Excellent
xizro wrote:
I suggest http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/23/********************************** It's an excellent source of info based on facts and scientific data, not media.


Thank you, Xizro.

EDIT: Resizing the image that shows events in the last 10 days makes it unreadable. For this one, follow the link.



Edited, Mar 24th 2011 12:06am by SmashingtonWho
#90 Mar 23 2011 at 4:38 PM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
Of lesser importance, businesses need power to mitigate the financial impact in the weeks to come. Where will power come from if this plant is permanently disabled? Will rolling blackouts continue indefinitely?


I don't think the nature of the ********* Daiichi facility is causing the rolling blackouts. Japan has 55 nuclear reactors, dozens of hydroelectric dams, several natural gas power plants, and a few other miscellaneous types of power plants. It really wouldn't miss these 6 reactors all that much. The blackouts have more to do with general damage to the infrastructure from the quake and tsunami.
#91 Mar 23 2011 at 4:59 PM Rating: Excellent
ForceOfMeh wrote:
I don't think the nature of the ********* Daiichi facility is causing the rolling blackouts. Japan has 55 nuclear reactors, dozens of hydroelectric dams, several natural gas power plants, and a few other miscellaneous types of power plants. It really wouldn't miss these 6 reactors all that much. The blackouts have more to do with general damage to the infrastructure from the quake and tsunami.


A very good point. I will have look into this more. Initial searches seem to indicate that the Daiichi plant itself is less central to the overall shortages than I had realized. Thanks for pointing this out.

Power shortages in Japan jolt global energy prices, recovery plans — The Associated Press
By: Joe McDonald
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/asia-pacific/power-shortages-in-japan-jolt-global-energy-prices-recovery-plans/article1945279/

Quote:
Japan shut down 11 of its 54 nuclear power plants after the quake — a major blow in an economy that relies on nuclear for 30 per cent of its power. The extent of possible damage to gas- or coal-fired generators and distribution grids is unclear. Estimates of generating capacity lost at least temporarily range from 10 to 40 per cent of Japan's total of 240 gigawatts.

“A bit of that has come back. Some of it will never come back,” said Mr. Feer. “Four of those reactors are a complete loss. Three have been filled with seawater and everybody acknowledges they will never come back online.”

For now, Japanese utilities are expected to fill the gap by revving up generators that run on gas, oil or coal. Fuel demand also is forecast to rise as rebuilding work starts. That could bring a windfall for oil or coal suppliers such as Indonesia or Australia but higher demand might push up prices.


Edited, Mar 23rd 2011 7:01pm by SmashingtonWho
#92 Mar 23 2011 at 5:57 PM Rating: Excellent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:

A very good point. I will have look into this more. Initial searches seem to indicate that the Daiichi plant itself is less central to the overall shortages than I had realized. Thanks for pointing this out.




Keep in mind that if the reactors are SCRAMed it means it takes a bit of time to reactivate them, with safey checks etc.
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#93 Mar 24 2011 at 9:31 AM Rating: Excellent
Photos from inside Japan's damaged nuclear plant - The Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/photos-from-inside-japans-damaged-nuclear-plant/article1954640/

Quote:
More than two dozen people have been injured trying to bring the ********* Daiichi plant under control since it began leaking radiation after suffering tsunami damage March 11. Here are some photos of the conditions at the plant.


Screenshot

Screenshot

Screenshot

Screenshot

Power shortages likely to persist - FT.com
By Jonathan Soble in Tokyo
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/cc5270a6-556f-11e0-a2b1-00144feab49a.html#axzz1HWpcnfKg
Quote:
The March 11 earthquake and tsunami knocked out 10 of Tokyo Electric Power’s 14 operational nuclear reactors – six at the radiation-leaking ********* Daiichi power station and another four at the less-damaged Daini plant nearby. Three other reactors at a plant outside the earthquake zone are also offline, after suffering problems in a quake in 2007.

This month’s disaster also damaged oil, coal and liquefied natural gas plants, accounting for 7 gigawatts of output, about 20 per cent of Tepco’s thermal generating capacity. Some of that has been recovered but several large plants are “in very bad shape”, Tepco said, and would take months or even years to fix.

Tepco can draw power from other regional utilities but one of its main outside sources, Tohoku Electric, is in the quake-hit north-east and has less than usual to spare. A quirk in Japan’s electrical grid – the centre and west operate on a 60 hertz frequency, while the east, including Tokyo, operates on 50 hertz – means only about 1GW can be borrowed from jurisdictions to the west.



New Problems at Japanese Plant Subdue Optimism - The New York Times
By: Keith Bradsher
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/24/world/asia/24nuclear.html?_r=1&amp
Quote:
Richard T. Lahey Jr., who was General Electric’s chief of safety research for boiling-water reactors when the company installed them at the ********* Daiichi plant, said that as seawater was pumped into the reactors and boiled away, it left more and more salt behind.

He estimates that 57,000 pounds of salt have accumulated in Reactor No. 1 and 99,000 pounds apiece in Reactors No. 2 and 3, which are larger.

The big question is how much of that salt is still mixed with water and how much now forms a crust on the uranium fuel rods.

Crusts insulate the rods from the water and allow them to heat up. If the crusts are thick enough, they can block water from circulating between the fuel rods. As the rods heat up, their zirconium cladding can rupture, which releases gaseous radioactive iodine inside and may even cause the uranium to melt and release much more radioactive material.
...
The spokeswoman said workers would try to repair a pump at Reactor No. 5, which was shut down at the time of the quake and has shown few problems. The pump abruptly stopped working Wednesday afternoon.
#94 Mar 24 2011 at 10:02 AM Rating: Good
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A more technical update (I suggest not use media outlets for information if possible, they're doing a horrible work):

http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html
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#95 Mar 24 2011 at 10:16 AM Rating: Decent
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More bad news. ********* is probably going to be the worst nuclear accident in history.

Quote:

Radioactive Iodine In ********* Seawater Highest Ever, Reactors 5 And 6 Now Leaking Too

And while futures rise as the market anticipates the latest central bank intervention to paper over the global financial insolvency, the radioactive fallout from ********* continues to worsen as Iodine 131 levels in the seawater hits the highest since the start of the crisis. "According to Tokyo Electric Power Co., radioactive iodine-131 146.9 times higher than the legal concentration limit was detected Wednesday morning in a seawater sample taken around 330 meters south of the plant, near the drain outlets of its troubled four reactors. The level briefly fell to 29.8 times the limit on Tuesday morning from 126.7 times on Monday, but rose to its highest so far in the survey begun this week apparently due to rain and water sprayed at spent fuel pools from outside that caused radioactive materials to seep into the sea, it said." What's far worse, reactors 5 and 6 which have been supposed to be ok, are also leaking: "The firm also said it found both iodine-131 and cesium-137 in a sample taken from near the drain outlets of the plant's No. 5 and No. 6 reactors that stabilized Sunday in so-called ''cold shutdown.'' The bad news is not only in immediate proximity to ********** "Iodine-131 19.1 times higher than the limit was also detected Wednesday afternoon in a sample taken some 16 kilometers south of the nuclear power station, up from 16.7 times on Tuesday."
Quote:

From Kyodo:

Abnormally high levels of radioactive materials were again detected in the sea near the crisis-hit nuclear power plant in ********* Prefecture, its operator said Thursday, warning the radiation levels in seawater may keep rising.

According to Tokyo Electric Power Co., radioactive iodine-131 146.9 times higher than the legal concentration limit was detected Wednesday morning in a seawater sample taken around 330 meters south of the plant, near the drain outlets of its troubled four reactors.

The level briefly fell to 29.8 times the limit on Tuesday morning from 126.7 times on Monday, but rose to its highest so far in the survey begun this week apparently due to rain and water sprayed at spent fuel pools from outside that caused radioactive materials to seep into the sea, it said.

The firm also said it found both iodine-131 and cesium-137 in a sample taken from near the drain outlets of the plant's No. 5 and No. 6 reactors that stabilized Sunday in so-called ''cold shutdown.''

Iodine-131 19.1 times higher than the limit was also detected Wednesday afternoon in a sample taken some 16 kilometers south of the nuclear power station, up from 16.7 times on Tuesday.

The current radiation levels in seawater do not pose an immediate risk to human health, an official of TEPCO told reporters, but added, ''We have to continue to monitor whether (radioactive materials in seawater) will keep rising.''


Source: http://www.zerohedge.com/article/radioactive-iodine-****************************************************************

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 12:16pm by Omena
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#96 Mar 24 2011 at 10:43 AM Rating: Decent
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xizro wrote:
A more technical update (I suggest not use media outlets for information if possible, they're doing a horrible work):

http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html


Please keep in mind that you are also linking to an agency that has direct links to hundreds of nuclear cover ups throughout the years which were never published.
#97 Mar 24 2011 at 2:18 PM Rating: Excellent
First pictures emerge of the ********* Fifty as steam starts pouring from all four reactors at the stricken nuclear power plant - Mail Online
By Matt Blake and Richard Shears
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1369216/Japan-nuclear-crisis-********************************************************

Quote:
Efforts to control the leakage of radiation from the crippled nuclear plant in Japan received a setback early today when steam began pouring from four reactor buildings.

Until then, black smoke billowing from one of the reactors had been the only concern - an incident which resulted in all work to cool four of the reactors being suspended on Wednesday.

At first light in Japan today [March 25th] officials were alarmed to see steam pouring from reactors 1, 2, 3, and 4.

It is the first time that steam has been seen rising from the No.1 reactor since the ********* plant was hit by the tsunami nearly two weeks ago.

Rising steam suggests that the fuel rods in the reactors are overheating and evaporating the small amount of water that surrounds them.

This is not directly related. Still pretty cool.
Screenshot

(ABOVE) Destroyed: A road in Naka, Iwake prefecture on March 11 shortly after being devastated by the earthquake
(March 11th)

Screenshot

(ABOVE) Transformation: The carriageway has already been reconstructed and tarmaced ready for use
(March 24th)

That was fast. Clearly rebuilding has begun.


Bonus: BABY PORPOISE RESCUED AFTER BEING DUMPED BY TSUNAMI IN FLOODED PADDY FIELD
By Matt Blake and Richard Shears
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1369216/Japan-nuclear-crisis-********************************************************
Screenshot

Quote:
A baby porpoise was rescued after surviving two weeks in a flooded paddy field.
The porpoise was dumped there by the 33ft tsunami that has devastated the east coast of Japan on March 11.

Pet-shop owner Ryo Taira... 32, found the porpoise struggling in the shallow seawater and after failing to net it, waded in to the field to cradle the 4ft creature to safety.

"It was pretty weak by then, which was probably the only reason we could catch it," he said.
...
He wrapped it in wet towels and drove it back to the sea, where he set it free.


Edited, Mar 24th 2011 4:55pm by SmashingtonWho
#98 Mar 24 2011 at 2:46 PM Rating: Excellent
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I'd like to point out that the it cannot be the "worst possible incident in nuclear history",as that's Chernobyl, a completely different beast (the reactor didn't have a containment shell and it was operating at full power!).

Also people should stop assuming the idea vapor = very little water remaining. Keep in mind one pump of Reactor 5 stopped working today. And let's avoid the "coverup" theory, shall we?
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#99 Mar 24 2011 at 3:47 PM Rating: Default
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xizro wrote:
I'd like to point out that the it cannot be the "worst possible incident in nuclear history",as that's Chernobyl, a completely different beast (the reactor didn't have a containment shell and it was operating at full power!).

Also people should stop assuming the idea vapor = very little water remaining. Keep in mind one pump of Reactor 5 stopped working today. And let's avoid the "coverup" theory, shall we?

********* has already released more radioactive material than Chernobyl did. Also, at least two reactors have a fission process going on within them right now. Don't believe the propaganda by TEPCO and the Japanese government. They've been misrepresenting the situation from the very beginning.

Also, the drinking water in Tokyo is no longer drinkable and the city is almost out of bottled water. It's a nightmare.

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 5:50pm by Omena
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#100 Mar 24 2011 at 4:03 PM Rating: Good
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Source please.

Omena wrote:
xizro wrote:
I'd like to point out that the it cannot be the "worst possible incident in nuclear history",as that's Chernobyl, a completely different beast (the reactor didn't have a containment shell and it was operating at full power!).

Also people should stop assuming the idea vapor = very little water remaining. Keep in mind one pump of Reactor 5 stopped working today. And let's avoid the "coverup" theory, shall we?

********* has already released more radioactive material than Chernobyl did. Also, at least two reactors have a fission process going on within them right now. Don't believe the propaganda by TEPCO and the Japanese government. They've been misrepresenting the situation from the very beginning.

Also, the drinking water in Tokyo is no longer drinkable and the city is almost out of bottled water. It's a nightmare.

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 5:50pm by Omena


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#101 Mar 24 2011 at 5:43 PM Rating: Excellent
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Omena wrote:

********* has already released more radioactive material than Chernobyl did. Also, at least two reactors have a fission process going on within them right now. Don't believe the propaganda by TEPCO and the Japanese government. They've been misrepresenting the situation from the very beginning.


Please, you can't be serious. Chernobyl had a rapture of the core, and since it had both no shell and was operating at full power, it got something like 5000 Sv out in a single burst (not to mention the following days). Here we're in the mSv range. Also, the concentration of I-133 and Cesium mean nothing if the half-life is not considered. The water got "contaminated" probably because of the rain. This has to be expected, since the reactors aren't completely safe, and the explosion surely left some radionuclides out. But comparing to Chernobyl...That's absurd.

Edited, Mar 25th 2011 1:43am by xizro
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