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Ongoing coverage of ********* threatFollow

#102 Mar 24 2011 at 6:44 PM Rating: Excellent
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Omena wrote:


********* has already released more radioactive material than Chernobyl did. Also, at least two reactors have a fission process going on within them right now. Don't believe the propaganda by TEPCO and the Japanese government. They've been misrepresenting the situation from the very beginning.

Also, the drinking water in Tokyo is no longer drinkable and the city is almost out of bottled water. It's a nightmare.



I'm sorry but LOL - that is seriously not the case.

When Chernobyl happened every other country world wide (Sweden were the first to notice, they actually notified the russian administration of the scale of the problem) were able to detect massive amounts of radiation. A huge radioactive cloud passed over many countries, most of europe (apart from those that denied the existance of the cloud lol)

Also, it was 6 months I believe before the sarcophagus was finished, sealing the core and finally stopping radiation leaking.

They never got that situation under control, they just put a box over it let's remember that eh!

Edited, Mar 24th 2011 8:46pm by MisterGaribaldi
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#103 Mar 25 2011 at 9:32 AM Rating: Excellent
March 25, 2011

2 Japanese nuclear workers hospitalized for radiation exposure - Los Angeles Times
By Julie Makinen
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-japan-quake-20110325,0,2343279.story
Quote:
The Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said water in the turbine room where the workers were exposed registered about 10,000 times the level of radiation found in coolant inside a reactor. That could indicate there was damage to the core and a leak through the containment vessel, the agency said.

The two hospitalized workers received a dose of 170 to 180 millisieverts of radiation while laying electrical cables in the basement of the building housing reactor No. 3, officials said. The average American, by comparison, is exposed to 6.2 millisieverts of radiation a year from natural sources, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Water used in the cooling process seeped into the workers' boots and came into contact with their skin, authorities said. The third worker was protected by his clothing. All three were equipped with radiation-detection devices, which sounded an alarm, but they continued to work, officials with Tokyo Electric Power Co. said. That revelation prompted Japanese nuclear officials Friday to call for a review of safety procedures at the site.


Breach in reactor suspected at Japanese nuke plant - theNorthwestern.com
http://www.thenorthwestern.com/article/20110325/OSH0101/110325028/1148/OSH02/Reactor-breach-feared-nuke-plant?odyssey=nav%7Chead

Quote:
TOKYO (AP) — A suspected breach in the core of a reactor at the stricken ********* nuclear plant could mean more serious radioactive contamination, Japanese officials revealed Friday, as the prime minister called the country's ongoing fight to stabilize the plant "very grave and serious."
...
The possible breach in Unit 3 might be a crack or a hole in the stainless steel chamber of the reactor core or in the spent fuel pool that's lined with several feet of reinforced concrete. The temperature and pressure inside the core, which holds the fuel rods, remained stable and was far lower than would further melt the core.

Suspicions of a possible breach were raised when two workers waded into water 10,000 times more radioactive than levels normally found in water in or around a reactor and suffered skin burns, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said.


Screenshot


Notice they have now sealed off their boots.

http://www.thenorthwestern.com/article/20110325/OSH0101/110325028/1148/OSH02/Reactor-breach-feared-nuke-plant?odyssey=nav%7Chead
These are just a few of the pictures that can be found at this site:
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Edited, Mar 25th 2011 11:35am by SmashingtonWho
#104 Mar 25 2011 at 10:10 AM Rating: Default
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#105 Mar 25 2011 at 10:34 AM Rating: Excellent
That article was written by the fictional character Tyler Durden from Fight Club.



EDIT: I spent a few hours last night searching up everything I could find on Chernobyl. Reports vary wildly. The internet was not quite as all-encompassing in 1986. The Chernobyl disaster caused international attention to be directed toward nuclear power safety that was unprecedented at the time. Finding reliable information from that time period is incredibly difficult.

http://environment.about.com/od/chernobyl/p/chernobyl.htm
Quote:
Estimates of the eventual death toll from Chernobyl vary widely. A 2005 report by the Chernobyl Forum—eight U.N. organizations—estimated the accident eventually would cause about 4,000 deaths. Greenpeace places the figure at 93,000 deaths, based on information from the Belarus National Academy of Sciences.


Deathlist from the Chernobyl wiki:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deaths_due_to_the_Chernobyl_disaster


If you have the time to read a fully sourced research paper discussing the long term effects of Cesium-137, please try this:
Chernobyl at Ten: Half-lives and Half Truths - by John M. LaForge
http://www.ratical.org/radiation/Chernobyl/Chernobyl@10p2.html#fn12
Quote:
Dr. Soyfer further discovered that the Soviets focused on and publicized the fallout's radioactive iodine content, but understated the amounts of other far more dangerous isotopes. While 10 to 15 percent of the fallout was iodine-131, the long-lived radionuclides strontium-90 and cesium-137 made up more than two thirds of the total contamination.
...
The British Medical Journal reported in 1995 that the rate of thyroid cancer in the region north of Chernobyl -- Ukraine and Belarus -- is 200 times higher than normal, and the (British) Imperial Cancer Research Fund found a 500 percent increase in thyroid cancers among Ukrainian children between 1986 and 1993.[14]
...
Cesium-137 contamination is probably Chernobyl's most devastating and ominous consequence. The body can't distinguish cesium from potassium, so it's taken up by our cells and becomes an internal source of radiation. Cesium-137 is a gamma emitter and its half-life of 30 years means that it stays in the soil, to concentrate in the food chain, for over 300 years. While iodine-131 remains radioactive for six weeks, cesium-137 stays in the body for decades, concentrating in muscle where it irradiates muscle cells and nearby organs.[16]

Strontium-90 is also long-lived and, because it resembles calcium, is permanently incorporated into bone tissue where it may lead to leukemia.
...
What everyone does know about nuclear reactors is that they have a record of whole-earth poisoning, and that their potential for more of the same is considered acceptable -- authorized in advance. This potential, for unlimited and uncontrollable radiation "accidents," has been deliberately developed, promoted, protected, ignored and then denied, or forgotten.

Sadly, denial and forgetfulness only make another Chernobyl inevitable.


The conclusion echoes your sentiments, if I understand your concern correctly.

Edited, Mar 25th 2011 1:04pm by SmashingtonWho
#106 Mar 25 2011 at 10:34 AM Rating: Decent
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I'd rather not use Reuters or any media outlet, since they have been spreading some big FUD over all the crisis. Also I'd like to point out the Chernobyl cancer estimates are, in large part, a myth (save the tiroid cancer, but that happened for a different reason). I wonder why some people can still compare a full working reactor exploding (Chernobyl) with a crippled plant that suffered structural damage and some (unknown) damage to the actual reactors, with some of them even sub-critical.
Also, regarding the workers, according to NHK they ignored (idiotically) the readings from their dosimeters, so they probably got an excessive amount of beta radiation (due to some water getting in contact with the skin), resulting in burns.
Also there may be some damage to the actual structure, but the exact details won't be certain until the actual instrumentation is powered up.

For the real lessson learnt from this, a more grounded in reality article: http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/25/preliminary-lessons-from-******************************************



Edited, Mar 25th 2011 6:35pm by xizro
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#107 Mar 25 2011 at 12:00 PM Rating: Good
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Japanese officials have reported findings that an unprotected person standing outside 30km NW of ********* would receive an annual dose of radiation in one day.

http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http://mainichi.jp/select/weathernews/20110311/news/20110326k0000m040150000c.html&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com&usg=ALkJrhh2tnutme6jjzPE-XHtWUXgk3FEeg

Edited, Mar 25th 2011 2:01pm by ForceOfMeh
#108 Mar 25 2011 at 1:44 PM Rating: Excellent
Japan Encourages a Wider Evacuation From Reactor Area - The New York Times
By HIROKO TABUCHI, KEITH BRADSHER and DAVID JOLLY
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/26/world/asia/26japan.html

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Above: Authorities in protective clothing at a hospital in ********* Prefecture on Friday prepared to transfer to another hospital workers who were exposed to radiation at the ********* Daiichi nuclear plant.

Quote:
A senior nuclear executive who insisted on anonymity but has broad contacts in Japan said that there was a long vertical crack running down the side of the reactor [#3] vessel itself. The crack runs down below the water level in the reactor and has been leaking fluids and gases, he said.

The severity of the radiation burns to the injured workers are consistent with contamination by water that had been in contact with damaged fuel rods, the executive said.

“There is a definite, definite crack in the [#3 reactor] vessel — it’s up and down and it’s large,” he said. “The problem with cracks is they do not get smaller.”
...

“What we’ve been finding is that in that area life has become quite difficult,” Noriyuki Shikata, deputy cabinet secretary for Mr. Kan said in a telephone interview. “People don’t want to go into the zone to make deliveries.”
...

There was some good news. Levels of the radioactive isotope found in Tokyo’s water supply fell Friday for a second day, officials said, dropping to 51 becquerels per liter, well below the country’s stringent maximum for infants.

On Wednesday Tokyo area stores were cleaned out of bottled water after the authorities said the isotope, iodine 131, had been detected in the city’s water supply and cautioned those in the affected areas not to give infants tap water. On Thursday cities in two of Tokyo’s neighboring prefectures, Chiba and Saitama, also reported disturbing levels of radiation in their water.
...

Officials continue to be dogged by suspicions that they are not telling the entire story about the radiation leaks. Shunichi Tanaka, former acting chairman of the country’s Atomic Energy Commission, told The Japan Times in an interview published Friday that the government was being irresponsible in forcing people from their homes around the damaged plant without explaining the risks they were facing.


Edited, Mar 25th 2011 4:37pm by SmashingtonWho
#109 Mar 25 2011 at 4:14 PM Rating: Good
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A more technical review, with emphasis on what is currently being done:

http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/RS_Fukushima_Daiichi_two_weeks_on_2503111.html
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#110 Mar 26 2011 at 12:26 PM Rating: Excellent
U.S. Naval Barges Bring Fresh Water To Assist With Cooling At Japan Nuclear Plant - The Huffington Post
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/26/us-assists-japan-nuclear-plant-fresh-water_n_840938.html

Screenshot


********* Reactors as of March 26
http://nextbigfuture.com/2011/03/**************************************
Quote:
Efforts to cool the reactors and fuel pools continues at the Daiichi site. Fresh water is now being used to cool reactors 1, 2 and 3 in lieu of seawater. Workers began injecting fresh water at reactors 1 and 3 on March 25 and at reactor 2 on March 26. Meanwhile, two U.S. Navy barges carrying 500,000 gallons fresh water are en route to a port 37 miles south of the ********* plant.


I wonder if this water will also be distributed as drinking water in the surrounding areas.

Edited, Mar 26th 2011 2:45pm by SmashingtonWho
#111 Mar 28 2011 at 9:59 AM Rating: Default
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Here we go again:
Quote:

Plutonium Found In ********** TEPCO Executive Says "Radioactive Substance Shouldn’t Have Any Impact On Human Health"
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 03/28/2011 10:59 -0400

Sh*t just got real. The spin? It is not harmful to human health. Oh really? We can't wait for Kan to eat some plutonium on national TV to confirm this. In the meantime we await the retraction from TEPCO claiming they made a mistake and they really meant platinum not plutonium.

Reuters confirms that this was merely yet another cover up:
Quote:

Plutonium has been found in soil at various points within Japan's stricken ********* Daiichi nuclear complex but does not present a risk to human health, operator Tokyo Electric Power Co <9501.T> (TEPCO) said on Monday.

TEPCO vice-president Sakae Muto told journalists at the company's latest briefing that test results showing the plutonium came from samples taken a week ago.

It was the latest bad news from the plant, where evidence of radiation has been mounting and engineers face a protracted battle to control reactors damaged by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11.


From Bloomberg:
Quote:

March 28 (Bloomberg) -- Tokyo Electric Power Co. found plutonium contamination in soil near the ********* Dai-Ichi nuclear plant that was tested, Sakae Muto, vice president at plant operator, said at a press conference shown on a webcast today.

The plutonium probably came after the accident at the reactors following Japan’s strongest earthquake and tsunami, he said. The radioactive substance shouldn’t have any impact on human health, he said.


Fear not: TEPCO will bravely continue to sacrifice its workers even after this discovery. Per Reuters:
Quote:

The discovery of plutonium at five places within Japan's damaged ********* Daiichi nuclear complex will not cause work there to be suspended, plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co said on Tuesday.


Attached is a [link=http://www.ans.org/misc/ANS-Technical-Brief-MOX-******************** from the ANS[/link] on why this discovery means that Reactor 3 is compromised.


Edited, Mar 28th 2011 11:59am by Omena
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#112 Mar 29 2011 at 12:11 AM Rating: Excellent
********* Nuclear Accident Update Log - Updates of 28 March 2011 - IEAE
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html

Quote:
NISA informed the IEC that a meeting is planned with TEPCO to determine the origin and path of water in the turbine buildings of Units 1 to 4. As seen with the contaminated workers, high dose rates in the turbine buildings and contaminated water in the basements can hamper recovery efforts.

The pumping of contaminated water from the basement floor of Unit 1's turbine building into its main condenser is in progress, whereas at Unit 2 that process has not begun because the steam condenser is full. At Unit 3, the pumping of contaminated water and in particular where it is going, are under consideration. The issue is also being examined for Unit 4.
..
A positive development is that the pumping of fresh water into the reactor pressure vessel of Unit 1 is to switch from the use of fire trucks to temporary electrical pumps running on offsite power on 29 March. At Unit 2, this switch was carried out on 27 March, with a diesel generator as backup in case offsite power is interrupted. Fresh water is also being injected continuously into the reactor pressure vessel of Unit 3, albeit currently pumped by fire trucks. The switch to temporary electrical pumps for this unit is planned for today.

On 27 March at Unit 3, water was sprayed into the spent fuel pool using a concrete pump truck, and seawater was also pumped in through the spent fuel cooling system. It is planned to start pumping fresh water into the spent fuel pool tomorrow.

It is also planned to commence pumping freshwater into the spent fuel pool of Unit 4 from tomorrow.

Units 5 and 6 remain in cold shutdown.

At noon today in Japan, the three workers mentioned in previous briefings were released from the National Institute of Radiological Sciences where they had been kept under observation.


It looks as if the plan is to get all of the reactors and spent fuel rod pools gradually switched to fresh water and temporary pumps fed with off site power, with additional back-up generators.

It seems that the radioactive water in Reactor buildings #3 and #4 is hampering efforts to supply water to the reactors other than by pumping from a distance.

If they don't drain this water to the sea, where will it go?
#113 Mar 29 2011 at 12:52 PM Rating: Decent
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SmashingtonWho wrote:
If they don't drain this water to the sea, where will it go?


I don't think draining it to the Sea is an Option...the best method of disposal is getting rid of it where the highest levels of radiation already exist, which is directly around ********* daiichi. The land is already going to be uninhabitable for years with the release of the plutonium.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12889541

Quote:
********* UPDATE (29 MAR)

* Reactor 1: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas explosion. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor
* Reactor 2: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage suspected. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor and adjoining tunnel
* Reactor 3: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage possible. Spent fuel pond partly refilled with water after running low. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor
* Reactor 4: Reactor shut down prior to quake. Fires and explosion in spent fuel pond; water level partly restored
* Reactors 5 & 6: Reactors shut down. Temperature of spent fuel pools now lowered after rising high
* Plutonium: Found at five locations in soil - levels said to represent no danger to human health



http://enenews.com/epa-radioactive-isotope-levels-are-increasing-these-types-of-findings-are-to-be-expected-in-the-coming-days

Quote:
EPA: Radioactive isotope levels are increasing in US — “These types of findings are to be expected in the coming days”


#114 Mar 29 2011 at 6:32 PM Rating: Decent
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http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20305-caesium-fallout-from-*******************************

Quote:
Caesium fallout from ********* rivals Chernobyl

Radioactive caesium and iodine has been deposited in northern Japan far from the ********* Daiichi nuclear plant, at levels that were considered highly contaminated after Chernobyl.

The readings were taken by the Japanese science ministry, MEXT, and reveal high levels of caesium-137 and iodine-131 outside the 30-kilometre evacuation zone, mostly to the north-north-west.
#115 Mar 29 2011 at 8:36 PM Rating: Excellent
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burtonsnow wrote:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20305-caesium-fallout-from-*******************************

Quote:
Caesium fallout from ********* rivals Chernobyl

Radioactive caesium and iodine has been deposited in northern Japan far from the ********* Daiichi nuclear plant, at levels that were considered highly contaminated after Chernobyl.

The readings were taken by the Japanese science ministry, MEXT, and reveal high levels of caesium-137 and iodine-131 outside the 30-kilometre evacuation zone, mostly to the north-north-west.


To be fair, things would have to be a lot worse to rival Chernobyl.

An untreatable, fatal dose of radiation is considered to be 8 Sieverts. Standing outside of the Chernobyl reactor for just 10 minutes when it blew would have exposed you 50 Sieverts.
#116 Mar 30 2011 at 2:19 AM Rating: Decent
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Yesterday afternoon they did some tests on water samples taken from the sea area near the nuclear plant of ********* and the result was that the level of Iodine131 is 3355 times beyond limit.. and that's the highest concentration ever found..

Edited, Mar 30th 2011 4:19am by KaineGestalt
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#117 Mar 30 2011 at 2:27 AM Rating: Good
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That's because the Reactor 2 suffered damage, the fact that there had been some sort of leak was almost a given for a while, even if the core seems ok.
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#118 Mar 30 2011 at 7:15 AM Rating: Default
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ForceOfMeh wrote:
burtonsnow wrote:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20305-caesium-fallout-from-*******************************

Quote:
Caesium fallout from ********* rivals Chernobyl

Radioactive caesium and iodine has been deposited in northern Japan far from the ********* Daiichi nuclear plant, at levels that were considered highly contaminated after Chernobyl.

The readings were taken by the Japanese science ministry, MEXT, and reveal high levels of caesium-137 and iodine-131 outside the 30-kilometre evacuation zone, mostly to the north-north-west.


To be fair, things would have to be a lot worse to rival Chernobyl.

An untreatable, fatal dose of radiation is considered to be 8 Sieverts. Standing outside of the Chernobyl reactor for just 10 minutes when it blew would have exposed you 50 Sieverts.


Way to go to spread nonsense...50 Sievert? Where did you get those numbers...thats nonsense. 50 Sievert KILLs you in a matter of minutes. In fact there were hundred of workers in Tschernobyl working while the radiation was leaking...so 50 Sievert is just nonsense, they would have died within minutes while working there. According to official sources(IAEA etc) 20+ Sievert will kill 100% of the people exposed to that radiation in 30min. 50 Sievert is supposed to make you pass out instantly and die within a minute.
#119burtonsnow, Posted: Mar 30 2011 at 8:27 AM, Rating: Sub-Default, (Expand Post) Edited, Mar 30th 2011 10:28am by burtonsnow
#120 Mar 30 2011 at 8:33 AM Rating: Good
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As I already said, despite no "public acceptance" by TEPCO, injecting seawater meant the deaths of those reactors.
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#121 Mar 30 2011 at 11:04 AM Rating: Default
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xizro wrote:
As I already said, despite no "public acceptance" by TEPCO, injecting seawater meant the deaths of those reactors.


Few are deft enough to get such simplicities. They feel denial and lies are better for their well being.

As a populace we need to stop looking to the people too afraid to tell us answers and decipher them upon our own accord.


Because I have watched "What the Bleep Do We Know" I am going to post this prayer request again.

Quote:
Prayers of Love and Gratitude for Water at Nuclear Plants in ********** Japan

A letter from Dr Masaru Emoto…

Please send your prayers of love and gratitude to water at the nuclear plants in ********** Japan!

By the massive earthquakes of Magnitude 9 and surreal massive tsunamis, more than 10,000 people are still missing…even now… It has been 16 days already since the disaster happened. What makes it worse is that water at the reactors of ********* Nuclear Plants started to leak, and it’s contaminating the ocean, air and water molecule of surrounding areas.

Human wisdom has not been able to do much to solve the problem, but we are only trying to cool down the anger of radioactive materials in the reactors by discharging water to them.

Is there really nothing else to do?

I think there is. During over twenty year research of hado measuring and water crystal photographic technology, I have been witnessing that water can turn positive when it receives pure vibration of human prayer no matter how far away it is.

Energy formula of Albert Einstein, E=MC2 really means that Energy = number of people and the square of people’s consciousness.

Now is the time to understand the true meaning. Let us all join the prayer ceremony as fellow citizens of the planet earth. I would like to ask all people, not just in Japan, but all around the world to please help us to find a way out the crisis of this planet!!
The prayer procedure is as follows.

Name of ceremony:
“Let’s send our thoughts of love and gratitude to all water in the nuclear plants in ************

Day and Time:
March 31st, 2011 (Thursday)
12:00 noon in each time zone

Please say the following phrase:
“The water of ********* Nuclear Plant,
we are sorry to make you suffer.
Please forgive us. We thank you, and we love you.”

Please say it aloud or in your mind. Repeat it three times as you put your hands together in a prayer position. Please offer your sincere prayer.

Thank you very much from my heart.

With love and gratitude,
Masaru Emoto
Messenger of Water
Emoto Peace Project
#122 Mar 30 2011 at 3:06 PM Rating: Excellent
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@burtonsnow

You do know that Masaru Emoto isn't actually a scientist, right? He's just one of these modern day pseudoscience gurus trying to sell books with new and exciting "science" that the dumb masses buy with both arms even though it's all complete nonsense.
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#123 Mar 30 2011 at 4:09 PM Rating: Default
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Omena wrote:
@burtonsnow

You do know that Masaru Emoto isn't actually a scientist, right? He's just one of these modern day pseudoscience gurus trying to sell books with new and exciting "science" that the dumb masses buy with both arms even though it's all complete nonsense.


Unfortunately for both sides of the argument it is all opinion and so to argue one way or another would be folly in my opinion. That is my position, I respect yours on the matter. **At the least it sure doesn't hurt anyone by praying for Japan at this time, so I will choose to do so.

Edited, Mar 30th 2011 6:10pm by burtonsnow
#124 Mar 30 2011 at 6:27 PM Rating: Excellent
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burtonsnow wrote:

Unfortunately for both sides of the argument it is all opinion and so to argue one way or another would be folly in my opinion. That is my position, I respect yours on the matter. **At the least it sure doesn't hurt anyone by praying for Japan at this time, so I will choose to do so.

No, it has nothing to do with opinion and everything to do with the fact that the few times he's tried to replicate his results in a double- or triple-blind test he's failed miserably. Not to mention that his ideas are ludicrous in general and completely go against our current understanding of physics. It's the same kind of BS as the Law of Attraction and Psi, both popular ideas pseudoscientists like to sell to the uninformed masses as actual science. Belief in any of these ideas is a result of either ignorance or faith, the latter of which would make it a kind of religion.


Edited, Mar 31st 2011 10:27am by Omena
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#125 Mar 30 2011 at 7:19 PM Rating: Excellent
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Shezard wrote:
ForceOfMeh wrote:
burtonsnow wrote:
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn20305-caesium-fallout-from-*******************************

Quote:
Caesium fallout from ********* rivals Chernobyl

Radioactive caesium and iodine has been deposited in northern Japan far from the ********* Daiichi nuclear plant, at levels that were considered highly contaminated after Chernobyl.

The readings were taken by the Japanese science ministry, MEXT, and reveal high levels of caesium-137 and iodine-131 outside the 30-kilometre evacuation zone, mostly to the north-north-west.


To be fair, things would have to be a lot worse to rival Chernobyl.

An untreatable, fatal dose of radiation is considered to be 8 Sieverts. Standing outside of the Chernobyl reactor for just 10 minutes when it blew would have exposed you 50 Sieverts.


Way to go to spread nonsense...50 Sievert? Where did you get those numbers...thats nonsense. 50 Sievert KILLs you in a matter of minutes. In fact there were hundred of workers in Tschernobyl working while the radiation was leaking...so 50 Sievert is just nonsense, they would have died within minutes while working there. According to official sources(IAEA etc) 20+ Sievert will kill 100% of the people exposed to that radiation in 30min. 50 Sievert is supposed to make you pass out instantly and die within a minute.


http://xkcd.com/radiation/

Workers were outside the Chernobyl reactor when it blew in 1986 because their instruments weren't capable of reading radiation levels that high and they still hadn't realized that primary containment had been breached. They worked all night pouring water over the reactor, not even wearing protective gear. When instruments that could read the high radiation levels were finally brought in, they initially thought they were defective because they couldn't believe it was as high as it was (5.6 roentgens per second) and kept working. Within 3 weeks, all those workers were dead.
#126 Mar 31 2011 at 1:19 PM Rating: Excellent
March 31, 2011

N-plant has long road ahead / Experts: Decommissioning ********* reactors to take decades - The Yomiuri Shimbun
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110331006033.htm

Quote:
Nuclear experts predict it will take decades to complete the decommissioning of the Nos. 1 to 4 reactors at the ************* No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata said Wednesday the company will decommission the four reactors, but [b]the most pressing task at the moment is how to dispose of the huge quantity of water that has become contaminated with radioactive materials
after being used to cool the reactors. Just disposing of this water will take a long time.

An estimated 13,000 tons of contaminated water has accumulated in trenches--tunnels used for maintenance of the reactors. A large quantity of contaminated water also has to be extracted from the basements of the reactors' turbine buildings, although the exact amount is unknown.

If the contaminated water can be removed, it will pave the way to reactivating the reactors' original cooling systems, which can lower the temperature of the reactor cores more efficiently than the methods now being employed.

Currently, however, workers at the plant are stymied by the contaminated water. They cannot even connect power cables outside the plant to the reactors' control systems.

It may be impossible to restore power to the reactor control systems if internal radiation levels are so high workers cannot repair the machinery, or if the contaminated water cannot be removed.

If water continues to leak, external tanks for temporarily storing it may become full. Workers and experts have said new facilities to store the contaminated water must be secured as soon as possible.

If all the contaminated water can be removed, the reactors then must be put in what is called cold shutdown to prevent the further discharge of large quantities of radioactive substances and bring the reactors into a stable state.

Cold shutdown means all control rods have been inserted into the reactors to stop nuclear fission chain reactions, and the coolant water inside the reactors is below 100 C.

Usually the temperature needs to be lowered further to remove fuel rods for regular checks or decommissioning.

"If the original cooling systems can be activated through a power supply from outside the plant and coolant water circulated, cold shutdown can be achieved in a day or two," Prof. Kenichiro Sugiyama of Hokkaido University said.

But it will likely take a few more years for the nuclear fuel rods to be cool enough to be removed from the reactors to decommission them.

On the other hand, if the current method--putting coolant water into the reactors with makeshift pumps--continues to be used, the situation may become more serious.

"Although the nuclear fuel would cool gradually, it would take at least several months to achieve cold shutdown," said Toru Ebisawa, a former associate professor of Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute.

This would mean using more water, which would increase the amount of contaminated water.

Currently, they need a way to remove and dispose of bulk contaminated water. This exact question has plagued nuclear power in general for its entire history. Japan does not have vast deserts where they can bury nuclear waste. It raises the question of whether the cost of safely exporting and disposing of nuclear waste is properly considered when making decisions on the ecomnomic viability of nuclear power.

Certainly, disposing of this amount of waste, under these conditions, considering time restraints and the amount of public scrutiny, is an unprecedented challenge.


From the same article, the following reports an enlightening history of the nuclear power plant decommissioning process:

Quote:
Overall, it will take decades to complete the process of decommissioning the reactors.

The Japan Atomic Power Co.'s Tokai plant in Ibaraki Prefecture was the first commercial nuclear power plant in Japan to begin being decommissioned. The plant ended commercial operations in 1998, and the decommissioning process is scheduled to end in 2021.

In the decommissioning process, fuel rods are removed and workers wait for levels of radioactivity to fall. During that time, power generators and other equipment with low levels of radiation contamination are decommissioned first.

In the final stage, reactors' steel containers and other equipment are cut into pieces and buried deep underground. At the Tokai plant, heat exchangers and other parts are now being removed.

But in the case of the ********* No. 1 nuclear power plant, in which reactors and buildings were damaged, it is doubtful whether the normal process of decommissioning will be possible.

Shojiro Matsuura, former chairman of the Nuclear Safety Commission, said, "This time, much more time and effort will be needed to lower radiation contamination levels. Twenty or 30 years probably won't be enough."

In the 1979 Three Mile Island accident in the United States, it took a month to achieve cold shutdown and six to seven years to remove melted fuel rods.

Fourteen years later, U.S. authorities declared the decommissioning process complete. Part of the nuclear fuel could not be recovered and remained in the reactors.


A long road indeed.

Edited, Mar 31st 2011 3:27pm by SmashingtonWho
#127 Mar 31 2011 at 2:58 PM Rating: Good
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Even not taking into account the accident, decommissioning is always a long process, especially since the current trend when disposing of nuclear plants dictates the so-called "green lawn condition", that means restoring the surrounding area as it was before the plant was built. It's an extremely complex procedure, and very costly.
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#128 Apr 01 2011 at 11:28 AM Rating: Excellent
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#129 Apr 01 2011 at 2:15 PM Rating: Excellent
Pontoon to hold Japan nuke plant water - Sky news.com
http://www.skynews.com.au/topstories/article.aspx?id=596262&vId=2296329

Quote:
The operator of Japan's disaster-stricken nuclear power plant plans to use a huge steel floating structure to contain radioactive water it releases.

The pontoon-type structure which can hold a maximum of 18,000 tonnes of water will be handed over to Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) by its owner which has been using it as a floating park for anglers, officials said on Friday.

Called a 'Mega-Float', it measures 136 metres long, 46 metres wide and three metres high and can hold up to 10,000 tonnes of water without sinking. It is owned by the Pacific coast city of Shimizu southwest of Tokyo.

'We've decided to provide it to the TEPCO because we want to help evacuees come back as soon as possible,' Shimizu mayor Zenkichi Kojima told reporters.
...
Hidehio Nishiyama, a spokesman for the government's nuclear safety agency, told reporters on Friday the Mega-Float is one of the options to contain radioactive water from the plant.

He said barges, tanks and storage buildings could be also used for the purpose.


Edited, Apr 1st 2011 4:17pm by SmashingtonWho
#130 Apr 01 2011 at 5:40 PM Rating: Excellent
Friday, 1 April 2011

********* Nuclear Accident Update Log - IEAE
http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html

Quote:
The Unit 1 condenser is full. In preparation for transferring water in the basement of the turbine building to the condenser, water in the condenser storage tank is being transferred to the suppression pool surge tank since 31 March, 03:00 UTC. Water in the trench was transferred to a water tank at the central environmental facility process main building. In order to prepare for removal of the water from the turbine building basement in Unit 2, pumping of water from the condenser to the suppression pool water surge tank started at 07:45 UTC 29 March. For Unit 3 pumping of water from the condenser to suppression pool water surge tank was started at 08:40 UTC March 28 and was completed at 23:37 UTC on 30 March.

For Unit 1 fresh water has been continuously injected into the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) through the feed-water line at an indicated flow rate of 8 m3/h using a temporary electric pump with diesel backup. In Unit 2 fresh water is injected continuously through the fire extinguisher line at an indicated rate of 8 m3/h using a temporary electric pump with diesel backup. In Unit 3 fresh water is being injected continuously at about 7 m3/h into the reactor core through the fire extinguisher line using a temporary electric pump with diesel backup.
...
The pumping of water into the Unit 1 Spent Fuel Pool by concrete pumping truck was started at 04:03 UTC on 31 March. Fresh water was sprayed to the spent fuel pool at the Unit 3 by the concrete pump on 31 March and to the spent fuel pool on Unit 4 on the 1st April.


They are now pumping contaminated water out of the trenches below the reactor buildings into the available storage containers. More storage capacity is on the way. (See post above.)

Will radiation levels decrease enough to provide manual access to buildings after these trenches are cleared? It seems even residual amounts of radioactive water would be problematic.

They are still pumping water via concrete truck onto spent fuel rod storage pools. If they could provide constant circulating water to these pools to maintain a lower temperature, I would expect radiation leves in the surrounding areas to decrease. Currently, sprayed water seems to be turning into steam on contact, which then appears to be dispersing into the atmosphere.

Edited, Apr 1st 2011 7:49pm by SmashingtonWho
#131 Apr 06 2011 at 6:03 PM Rating: Decent
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Best and most diverse source of information I've come across in a while....it goes through just about every aspect of this disaster:

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/7765#comments_top
#132 Apr 07 2011 at 9:51 AM Rating: Excellent
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#133 Apr 07 2011 at 11:13 AM Rating: Excellent
Hopefully this one doesn't trigger another tsunami (doesn't look like it will create one because it's epicenter, but you never know)... prayers to all in Japan.

*EDIT* Found this story I missed the other day. It's quite uplifting and a good 1 minute read.
http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/04/03/japan.tsunami.captain/index.html

Edited, Apr 7th 2011 5:17pm by PerrinofSylph
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#134 Apr 07 2011 at 5:25 PM Rating: Excellent
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#135 Apr 11 2011 at 5:54 PM Rating: Decent
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Japan may raise nuke accident severity level to highest 7 from 5

http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2011/04/84721.html


I am fed up with these people....enough with the bullsh*t, I and millions of others want to know what the @#%^ is going on at ********* already.


Also on a side note....I remember reading somewhere that ********* can be translated into:


***** to blow (wind etc)
***** to wipe, to dry
***** to emit, to spout


shima: island


Interesting correlation.

Edited, Apr 11th 2011 7:59pm by burtonsnow
#136 Apr 11 2011 at 6:21 PM Rating: Good
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burtonsnow wrote:
Japan may raise nuke accident severity level to highest 7 from 5

Officially INES level 7 now.

burtonsnow wrote:
***** to blow (wind etc)
***** to wipe, to dry
***** to emit, to spout

The kanji for **** used in ********* means "Good Fortune", none of the above.
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#137 Apr 12 2011 at 9:58 AM Rating: Good
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#138 May 16 2011 at 3:49 PM Rating: Good
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The Wall Street Journal reports that one of the ********* reactors had actually melted down only 16 hours after the initial 9.0 earthquake that occurred on March 11.

Due to the discovery that much less water remains than expected in reactor cores 2 and 3, it is also feared that these reactors are leaking highly contaminated water into the environment.

As a result of these revelations, the maximum rating of a Level 7 incident, the same as Chernobyl, is undoubtedly deserved. Initial plans had called for the reactors be brought to a safe shutdown level in as little as 6 to 9 months, but with the latest information, these plans will most certainly have to be revised.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703509104576325110776621604.html?mod=e2tw

Edited, May 16th 2011 5:52pm by ForceOfMeh
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#139 May 16 2011 at 6:51 PM Rating: Default
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@#%^ TEPCO, @#%^ Japan's Minister Kan, @#%^ corporate fascists whose only concern is profit. WAKE UP PEOPLE, this is devastating, our planet may never be the same:


http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2011/05/16/was-***************************

Edited, May 16th 2011 8:51pm by burtonsnow
#140 May 16 2011 at 7:02 PM Rating: Good
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Too soon?
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#141 May 16 2011 at 8:54 PM Rating: Good
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[quote=burtonsnow]@#%^ TEPCO, @#%^ Japan's Minister Kan, @#%^ corporate fascists whose only concern is profit. WAKE UP PEOPLE, this is devastating, our planet may never be the same:


http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2011/05/16/was-******************************************** thrown in a "sheeple" somewhere.
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#142 May 17 2011 at 6:43 AM Rating: Decent
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burtonsnow wrote:
@#%^ TEPCO, @#%^ Japan's Minister Kan, @#%^ corporate fascists whose only concern is profit. WAKE UP PEOPLE, this is devastating, our planet may never be the same:


http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2011/05/16/was-***************************

Edited, May 16th 2011 8:51pm by burtonsnow


To be fair the planet hasn't been the same since humans began treading it.
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#143 May 17 2011 at 9:41 AM Rating: Decent
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Mistress Theonehio wrote:
burtonsnow wrote:
@#%^ TEPCO, @#%^ Japan's Minister Kan, @#%^ corporate fascists whose only concern is profit. WAKE UP PEOPLE, this is devastating, our planet may never be the same:


http://ecocentric.blogs.time.com/2011/05/16/was-***************************

Edited, May 16th 2011 8:51pm by burtonsnow


To be fair the planet hasn't been the same since humans began treading it.


*since the western world has dominated its growth*

Plain and simple we may be advancing our way of life, but we aren't advancing our species continued existence. Quite the opposite actually. It is not about sheeple....we all know whats going on, but "everyone has their own $#|+ to handle".
#144 May 24 2011 at 10:03 AM Rating: Excellent
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#145 May 25 2011 at 12:47 PM Rating: Good
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#146 May 26 2011 at 1:19 PM Rating: Excellent
Screenshot


Greenpeace: Japan nuclear plant radiation accumulating in marine life - Brad Lendon
http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2011/05/26/greenpeace-japan-nuclear-plant-radiation-accumulating-in-marine-life/

Quote:
Radiation from Japan's damaged ********* Daiichi nuclear plant is accumulating in marine life off Japan's coast above legal limits for food contamination, Greenpeace said Thursday.

The environmental group said its findings run counter to Japanese government reports that radiation from the ********* plant, damaged in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, is being diluted as time passes.

Despite what the authorities are claiming, radioactive hazards are not decreasing through dilution or dispersion of materials, but the radioactivity is instead accumulating in marine life," Greenpeace radiation expert Jan Vande Putte said in a press release.

Greenpeace said its teams collected samples of marine life along the ********* coast and in international waters outside Japan's 12-mile territorial limit. The samples were tested by nuclear research laboratories in France and Belgium, and high levels of radioactive iodine and cesium were found, it said.

Fish, shellfish and seaweed all showed significant levels of radioactive contamination, according to Greenpeace. All are widely consumed in Japan.

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