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Hotfixes incoming 11 APR 2012Follow

#1 Apr 10 2012 at 10:49 AM Rating: Good
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http://lodestone.finalfantasyxiv.com/pl/news/detail?newsId=487cb5049853c8f0289850c57b45bcb8a2f64654

Quote:
At the following time, we will be performing maintenance on FINAL FANTASY XIV to implement hotfixes for patch 1.21a. During this period, FINAL FANTASY XIV will be unavailable.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

[Date & Time]
Apr. 11, 2012 from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (PDT)

* The completion time may be subject to change.

[Affected Service]
- FINAL FANTASY XIV


Maybe they'll re-fix Ul'Dah inn... pfffftttt
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#2 Apr 10 2012 at 11:18 AM Rating: Good
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Quote:

hotfixes


Why do software companies now use 'hotfix' to describe a planned maintenance outage? Not so 'hot' to me.
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#3 Apr 10 2012 at 11:54 AM Rating: Good
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volta1 wrote:
Quote:

hotfixes


Why do software companies now use 'hotfix' to describe a planned maintenance outage? Not so 'hot' to me.


Mistranslation? Actually there was a thread on the LodeStone forums talking about just that... Answered by a Dev... Well, sorta answered. I'm being lazy right now or I'd find it for you.
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EVE Online:ScraperX; Retired
WAR:IronClaw- Peryn SW;SkullThrone- Grymloc BO; Retired


#4 Apr 10 2012 at 11:59 AM Rating: Decent
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volta1 wrote:
Quote:

hotfixes


Why do software companies now use 'hotfix' to describe a planned maintenance outage? Not so 'hot' to me.


As far as I know hotfixes are to address major issues and bugs introduced in the prior release. They occur between feature releases and usually only include bug fixes. That's what makes them 'hot' I guess. You still have to plan these on a release schedule though. Any deployments outside of the release schedule would be considered an emergency hotfix.
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#5 Apr 10 2012 at 12:02 PM Rating: Decent
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Perrin a hotfix is a term used frequently in the Software Development Life Cycle. It's not a mistranslation.
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#6 Apr 10 2012 at 12:09 PM Rating: Good
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reptiletim wrote:
Perrin a hotfix is a term used frequently in the Software Development Life Cycle. It's not a mistranslation.


I understand this...
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FFXI:Sylph - Perrin 75 Hume THF; Retired (At least from my use any way)
EVE Online:ScraperX; Retired
WAR:IronClaw- Peryn SW;SkullThrone- Grymloc BO; Retired


#7 Apr 10 2012 at 12:21 PM Rating: Excellent
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reptiletim wrote:
Perrin a hotfix is a term used frequently in the Software Development Life Cycle. It's not a mistranslation.


Technically, the term "hotfix" generally implies that the service stays running while the fix is being implemented (and thus "hot" from continued operation). If FFXIV is going to be unavailable, then it's not really a hotfix but a patch. That said, "hotfix" is often applied to minor bug fixes anyway, even with downtime, to avoid the impression that a serious problem exists.
#8 Apr 10 2012 at 12:56 PM Rating: Decent
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Xoie wrote:
reptiletim wrote:
Perrin a hotfix is a term used frequently in the Software Development Life Cycle. It's not a mistranslation.


Technically, the term "hotfix" generally implies that the service stays running while the fix is being implemented (and thus "hot" from continued operation). If FFXIV is going to be unavailable, then it's not really a hotfix but a patch. That said, "hotfix" is often applied to minor bug fixes anyway, even with downtime, to avoid the impression that a serious problem exists.


This is what I was getting at. Thanks
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#9 Apr 10 2012 at 1:30 PM Rating: Decent
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volta1 wrote:
Quote:

hotfixes


Why do software companies now use 'hotfix' to describe a planned maintenance outage? Not so 'hot' to me.


In release engineering and management, hotfix means a completely different thing then live update. If you read the wiki definition, it is a little biased and uneducated as to the use of the term. In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).

So, just a quick definition trainer for you:
Install: The package or process for downloading (the act of retrieving software from a remote device or system to a local device or system) and assembling an application (single entry point executable with or without support files and other multi-entry point executables) or suite (multiple single entry point executables with associated files) on a computer operating environment (ussually based on OS, but can also imply emulated devices, or connected services/mediums).

Update: the package or process for downloading and modifying an existing application, suite, or collection of applications. This can include Upgrades, Service Packs, Patches, HotFixes, and can also be a live update.

Major Release: Typically identified as a new Major version (requirement by MSI, if MSI is used as the install engine). Includes new APIs, SDKs, or major functional shifts or designs. A Major update is typically shipped as a Remove and Re-Install package. Typically keeps user settings and preferences.

Service Pack: A collection of patches and hotfixes rolled into a single update to take a system (application, suite, collection of applications) from any point from it's base up to a specific point. This is also known as a cumulative update.

Patch: An update to a system to bring the software from a known base to a new point, typically identified by new features, collection of Hotfixes/bug fixes, but typically the environment for the application stays the same, as well as the base functionality, and User Interface (though, they may have minor changes to accompany the other fixes that were applied). The scope and level of change associated with a Patch are usually identified by the project manager. As well, they typically need to fit within a specific rule-set of the installation software (e.g. for MSI, no removal of features or components, all files removed must be identified, and accounted for in the patch process, the installation interface can not have significant changes, and no large scale component change, such as major Merge Module updates, or API changes, without the risk of damaging the installation package already installed).

HotFix: An update to the system that is only altering existing files or functionality to correct issues within the current system. Should not have major functional changes. Typically does not have new features or functions.

Live Update, any type of update that can be performed on a system, without the need to restart the system involved. These are typically seen as server side updates on a client/server application. But self-healing applications are a current design paradigm that leading developers and software engineers have been researching. However, that type of technology is not available in most consumer software (there are some fringe developers and engineers that have incorporated it into their applications, and IBM is currently the leader in this area with dozens if not hundreds of patents on differing implementations related to self-healing software).

I hope this clears up some of the confusion around the use of the term Hotfix.

(My references to MSI are simply just that, a reference. As it is currently the most used Install Engine used, however, from what I can tell, it is either not used, or only used for the initial installation of Final Fantasy, and typically doesn't play well with other install/update mechanisms).
#10 Apr 10 2012 at 1:51 PM Rating: Decent
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rfolkker wrote:
In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I'll ignore the rest of your pedantic attempt to impress and point out that unless by 'recently' you meant the last 25 years, it's hard to take you seriously after reading the introduction paragraph to your essay.
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#11 Apr 10 2012 at 2:29 PM Rating: Decent
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Where I work hotfixes are just changes that are important enough to need installing before the next scheduled maintenance. Some of these changes might be seen without cycling the servers but most are not. It depends on what is changing.
#12 Apr 10 2012 at 2:50 PM Rating: Decent
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volta1 wrote:
rfolkker wrote:
In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I'll ignore the rest of your pedantic attempt to impress and point out that unless by 'recently' you meant the last 25 years, it's hard to take you seriously after reading the introduction paragraph to your essay.


I apologize, my reference to the term recently was based off of The current Microsoft Patent. and my IBM comment was based on the z900 computer system released on Dec 18th, 2000 being the first system I was aware of that could perform a Firmware update without resetting the system.

I apologize for my ignorance.
#13 Apr 10 2012 at 4:09 PM Rating: Decent
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rfolkker wrote:
software


rfolkker wrote:
Firmware


These are different.
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#14 Apr 10 2012 at 4:19 PM Rating: Good
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rfolkker wrote:
In release engineering and management, hotfix means a completely different thing then live update. If you read the wiki definition, it is a little biased and uneducated as to the use of the term. In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I believe the term "hotfix" goes back to the UNIX sysadmin days (which is a lot older than 20 years) where you really could have a situation where you're updating the server without shutting it down or disconnecting / otherwise interrupting any clients who were connected. But, like I said, the term has taken on meaning any minor fix (or patch of a patch). I'm pretty sure the original intention, what was meant by "hot," was to indicate that the server would still be available as the fix was applied, even if it isn't commonly used that way anymore. If I'm mistaken, then I'm sorry for confusing anyone.

Edited, Apr 10th 2012 6:23pm by Xoie
#15 Apr 10 2012 at 5:04 PM Rating: Decent
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Xoie wrote:
rfolkker wrote:
In release engineering and management, hotfix means a completely different thing then live update. If you read the wiki definition, it is a little biased and uneducated as to the use of the term. In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I believe the term "hotfix" goes back to the UNIX sysadmin days (which is a lot older than 20 years) where you really could have a situation where you're updating the server without shutting it down or disconnecting / otherwise interrupting any clients who were connected. But, like I said, the term has taken on meaning any minor fix (or patch of a patch). I'm pretty sure the original intention, what was meant by "hot," was to indicate that the server would still be available as the fix was applied, even if it isn't commonly used that way anymore. If I'm mistaken, then I'm sorry for confusing anyone.

Edited, Apr 10th 2012 6:23pm by Xoie


Exactly.

"Hotfix"
"Hot swappable"
"Hot standby"

All these terms have common origin. 'Hot' indicates no disruption to system availability. As I stated in my first post, I'm not sure exactly when this deviation first occurred in the software world. So people can talk about how they use it and cite all the random factoids they want. It doesn't change the fact that the term is not used in the way that it is meant to be.

I won't even go into the posts claiming it was "never" that way. Yeesh.
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#16 Apr 10 2012 at 6:35 PM Rating: Excellent
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rfolkker wrote:
volta1 wrote:
rfolkker wrote:
In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I'll ignore the rest of your pedantic attempt to impress and point out that unless by 'recently' you meant the last 25 years, it's hard to take you seriously after reading the introduction paragraph to your essay.


I apologize, my reference to the term recently was based off of The current Microsoft Patent. and my IBM comment was based on the z900 computer system released on Dec 18th, 2000 being the first system I was aware of that could perform a Firmware update without resetting the system.

I apologize for my ignorance.


From what I understand, Unix administrators (and recall that AT&T Unix goes back to 1969) have always been very reluctant to restart their servers which is the opposite philosophy of the Windows administrator who uses a reboot as one of the first diagnostic steps. The year 2000 is not the first case of an always-on server (except maybe in the Windows world).
#17 Apr 10 2012 at 7:09 PM Rating: Excellent
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volta1 wrote:
Quote:
hotfixes
Why do software companies now use 'hotfix' to describe a planned maintenance outage? Not so 'hot' to me.


I dunno... it's kind of getting me in the mood... >_>
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#18 Apr 10 2012 at 7:14 PM Rating: Default
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volta1 wrote:
Xoie wrote:
rfolkker wrote:
In release engineering and management, hotfix means a completely different thing then live update. If you read the wiki definition, it is a little biased and uneducated as to the use of the term. In the 20 years I have heard/used the term, it has never meant live update, as software has not, until recently supported live updates (and as such, software adopted the term "Live Update" to encompass such an update).


I believe the term "hotfix" goes back to the UNIX sysadmin days (which is a lot older than 20 years) where you really could have a situation where you're updating the server without shutting it down or disconnecting / otherwise interrupting any clients who were connected. But, like I said, the term has taken on meaning any minor fix (or patch of a patch). I'm pretty sure the original intention, what was meant by "hot," was to indicate that the server would still be available as the fix was applied, even if it isn't commonly used that way anymore. If I'm mistaken, then I'm sorry for confusing anyone.

Edited, Apr 10th 2012 6:23pm by Xoie


Exactly.

"Hotfix"
"Hot swappable"
"Hot standby"

All these terms have common origin. 'Hot' indicates no disruption to system availability. As I stated in my first post, I'm not sure exactly when this deviation first occurred in the software world. So people can talk about how they use it and cite all the random factoids they want. It doesn't change the fact that the term is not used in the way that it is meant to be.

I won't even go into the posts claiming it was "never" that way. Yeesh.

So, where exactly is this information? I can't seem to find anything that backs up what you are saying.
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